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I recently downloaded Ubuntu 7.10 to set up a dual boot with XP on my main computer, with XP on my internal HD and Ubuntu on an external 60GB drive. ...
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  1. #1
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    Grub problems with Ubuntu 7.10


    I recently downloaded Ubuntu 7.10 to set up a dual boot with XP on my main computer, with XP on my internal HD and Ubuntu on an external 60GB drive. I have looked around and tried some of the solutions, but I am still getting an Error 21 problem while trying to boot up. I have tried some of the terminal commands, and one solution that said about using the actual installer to fix GRUB, but I can't get it fixed. I think it is partly due to not knowing enough about it, but any suggestions on how to get this fixed?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Hi and Welcome !

    Does your Machine's BIOS support booting up from External Drive?
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
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    Well, I figured out something, but it cost me the files on my windows partition, I took the 250GB and separated it out into two partitions one for linux and one for windows, but now the problem is connecting to the internet, I can't figure out how to get linux to connect so that I can do anything really on it. What I've done so far is I have gotten the files I think I need, but I am still very new to this, so I am having a problem getting the files to set up. I am trying to use ndiswrapper that I found after digging through the forums, but I haven't been able to get it to actually work. Linux tried to install it, but it is saying there aren't any utilities and I can't figure out how to add them to it. If I should start a new thread for this that would be great. Also sorry about a late update on it, and thank you for attempting to help with that. I think my BIOS supported it, but I just got annoyed with it and decided to just go with the way mentioned above. Thank you again for any help you guys can spare for a newbie to linux.

  4. #4
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    Did not need to cost that much!

    Quote Originally Posted by Carinix View Post
    Well, I figured out something, but it cost me the files on my windows partition, I took the 250GB and separated it out into two partitions one for linux and one for windows, but now the problem is connecting to the internet, I can't figure out how to get linux to connect so that I can do anything really on it. What I've done so far is I have gotten the files I think I need, but I am still very new to this, so I am having a problem getting the files to set up. I am trying to use ndiswrapper that I found after digging through the forums, but I haven't been able to get it to actually work. Linux tried to install it, but it is saying there aren't any utilities and I can't figure out how to add them to it. If I should start a new thread for this that would be great. Also sorry about a late update on it, and thank you for attempting to help with that. I think my BIOS supported it, but I just got annoyed with it and decided to just go with the way mentioned above. Thank you again for any help you guys can spare for a newbie to linux.
    It is possible to resize existing disk partitions - including those containing Windows. Until fairly recently the technology to read and write Windows file systems using the NTFS file system commonly found on Windows XP (and now Vista) systems was not sufficiently mature to rely on, but that issue is now considered resolved. Older Windows file systems, such as FAT16 and FAT32 have been supported on Linux systems for years.

    Given this information, the first thing to do is to use a Partition resizing tool. Many years ago you had to either purchase a commercial tool to do this or use a very arcane, problem prone tool to resize existing disk partitions to make room for new partitions for Linux systems. This is no longer the case. Multiple partition management tools that work a lot like Partition magic now exist. Qtparted and gparted are two examples that are now included in many Linux distributions. There are other external tools you can also use, including commercial tools like Partition Commander or Partition Magic.

    Therefore, it is not necessary at all to have to start from scratch when you have an existing system in place. It is always a good idea to back up your work, in case you make a mistake or in case there is some kind of failure, but it is now quite straightforward to resize, repartition, and create many distinct operating system instances on a single computer. This is more true than ever with the big disks often found on today's desktop systems.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

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