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I'm trying to install Adobe Reader 8 and the command #dpkg -1 AdobeReader_enu-8.1.3-1.i386.deb comes up with the message error processing AdobeReader Cannot access archive. No such file or directory. Error ...
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  1. #1
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    Installing Adobe Reader correctly


    I'm trying to install Adobe Reader 8 and the command
    #dpkg -1 AdobeReader_enu-8.1.3-1.i386.deb

    comes up with the message

    error processing AdobeReader Cannot access archive. No such file or directory. Error was encountered while processing:

    Can anyone help.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux User saivin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sillymoo View Post
    I'm trying to install Adobe Reader 8 and the command
    #dpkg -1 AdobeReader_enu-8.1.3-1.i386.deb
    Its -i, the lowercase I, the I as in India.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sillymoo View Post
    error processing AdobeReader Cannot access archive. No such file or directory.
    Have you completely downloaded the package? and are you executing that package inside the directory where you have downloaded it? cross-check. i tend to do such silly mistakes very often.

    Btw, why do you need Adobe's reader? You have equally good and may be even better pdf readers for linux!
    A candle looses nothing by lighting other candles. - Khalil Zibran.
    Registered Linux User #490076

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    Quote Originally Posted by saivin View Post
    Its -i, the lowercase I, the I as in India.

    Have you completely downloaded the package? and are you executing that package inside the directory where you have downloaded it? cross-check. i tend to do such silly mistakes very often.

    Btw, why do you need Adobe's reader? You have equally good and may be even better pdf readers for linux!
    Yes, I completely downloaded and extracted it.

    No, not to a directory. I downloaded it to Desktop and then transferred it to a special file I'd created.

    Later, I decided to activate the KDE pdf and it works fine.

    Thanks for your kind help.

    Sillymoo.

  4. #4
    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    I think Adobe Reader is in the Debian Multimedia repository. Add the following line to your /etc/apt/sources.list

    deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org lenny main
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

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    Thanks Daan

    I tried out your advices, but I am getting the same message I've gotten with other commands I've tried inserting in their relevant file which is,

    Could not save the file /etc/apt/sources.list.save

    You do not have the necessary permissions to save the file. Please check that you have typed the location correctly and try again.

  6. #6
    Linux User saivin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sillymoo View Post
    Could not save the file /etc/apt/sources.list.save

    You do not have the necessary permissions to save the file. Please check that you have typed the location correctly and try again.
    Thats probably because you might have tried to save as regular user. You need to be root to save in /etc directory (or its subdirectories).
    A candle looses nothing by lighting other candles. - Khalil Zibran.
    Registered Linux User #490076

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    I signed in as root. That part I've already established. In other words, I already know that.

  8. #8
    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sillymoo View Post
    I signed in as root. That part I've already established. In other words, I already know that.
    Hehehe...

    The error message does suggest you are not root. I would imagine root has the permission to edit the file /etc/apt/sources.list, or any other file (note that it should not be not called /etc/apt/sources.list.save as you mention).

    Please do in a terminal

    Code:
    # whoami
    and

    Code:
    # ls -l /etc/apt/sources.*
    and post the output here.
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daan View Post
    Hehehe...

    The error message does suggest you are not root. I would imagine root has the permission to edit the file /etc/apt/sources.list, or any other file (note that it should not be not called /etc/apt/sources.list.save as you mention).

    Please do in a terminal

    Code:
    # whoami
    and

    Code:
    # ls -l /etc/apt/sources.*
    and post the output here.
    root (in response to the 1st command line)

    and below (in response to the 2nd)

    /etc/apt/sources.list
    /etc/apt/sources.list~
    /etc/apt/sources.list.save

    /etc/apt/sources.list.d:

    TOTAL 0

    The tutorials I read, didn't mention the above commands. They simply that said to be root, you had to type su if using the regular terminal and then enter your password to make you root.

    PS How do you save the above set of commands in the terminal? There is no save button.

    I created a profile and expected the above set of commands to be saved to it, but the profile page remained empty.

  10. #10
    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    The "whoami" command is just to check that you have succesfully switched user to root. The output confirmed that you did. When I am root at my system, I can edit my /etc/apt/sources.list. You cannot, that is why I want to have a look at the permissions of that file. Therefore, the second command. But I think you have forgotten the "-l" (l for "long") there. When I isue "ls -l /etc/apt/sources.*" I get a long list of all files in the directory /etc/apt/ whose name start with "sources.". Long here means that it gives more info than just the name of the file: also size, time of last change, ownership, and what we are partivulary interested in here: permissions.

    Try again please.

    You dont need to save these commands. You could put them in text file and then run that text file (a "script") instead of each command separatley, but since these are such simple commands, I don't think you need to put them in s script.

    If you meant that you want to copy the commands and output from the terminal you can simply select them with your mouse and copy paste with right clicking, as you would in most graphical user interface programs.
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

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