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Hi, I have Debian loaded but need to change the boot order, I have read that modifying the file menu.lst is the answer, but the system will not allow me ...
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  1. #1
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    Boot order change.


    Hi,

    I have Debian loaded but need to change the boot order, I have read that modifying the file menu.lst is the answer, but the system will not allow me to save the file once I have modified it. How can I overcome this? If I try to boot as admin I get the message "Administrator cannot log on from this screen" - how absurd is that? can I switch from a normal user to admin ?? I am new to Linux so if it is a command line solution please guide me button for button..

    THanx,

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer b2bwild's Avatar
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    Using root completely in graphical enviroment, can be very harmful to system.
    Simply type following command.
    # gksu gedit
    Open your text file. edit it and save it.
    Remember to be carefull, or you get messed up with sensetive configuration files.

    To do the same via CLI type.
    # sudo nano /boot/grub/menu.lst
    Never make any misteaks.

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  3. #3
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    Got there thanks! - Second question, I have a second drive on the system where all my data is kept, it has two partitions, one is FAT32 the other is NTFS, but I am denied access to either (you do not have permission to mount this drive). How can I set it up so that whenever I log on I can use these extra drives? - this is a bit perplexing since my 8GB pen drive is seen by both systems but I don't want to transfer data from one system to another and waste space with two copies on the same system.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Edit /etc/fstab file and add entries of both partitions to mount those at startup. You will have full privileges in both partitions.


    First of all, create mount points ( folders) for both partitions.
    Code:
    cd /media
    sudo mkdir FAT NTFS
    Execute sudo fdisk -l command and note down device name assigned to both partitions.
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Let say, first partition is /dev/sdb1 ( FAT32 ) and second partition is /dev/sdb2 ( NTFS ).
    Press Alt+F2 and type this
    Code:
    gkdu gedit /etc/fstab
    Add this at the end of /etc/fstab file.
    Code:
    /dev/sdb1  /media/FAT  vfat  defaults,umask=0  0  0
    /dev/sdb2  /media/NTFS  ntfs-3g  defaults,umask=0  0  0
    Save file and reboot machine. Check /media/FAT and /media/NTFS folders.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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