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Hello I don't understand why this is happening. I have two drives in this system, Drive A has Windows 7 on one half and the other half has ubuntu 9.10, ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    Question [SOLVED] When drive is added, everything goes south-Debian-Win7-ubuntu


    Hello
    I don't understand why this is happening. I have two drives in this system, Drive A has Windows 7 on one half and the other half has ubuntu 9.10, both run great, no problems with boot-loader.

    I added another drive to this system and installed Debian 5.04 in headless mode, and the installation went well. I'm using the F12 key to boot the new drive. Reason I'm using the F12 by the way, is that the Debian boot-loader (grub) reported my windows7 copy as vista, and didn't see the ubuntu as being present on drive A.
    I didn't want to chance over writing the boot-loader on drive A. So I disconnected the drive A and reinstalled Debian on drv B.
    when I plug in the windows/ubuntu drive (drive-A) Debian boots with all kinds off errors saying that it can't find certain paths. mouthing dev root failed, no such file or directory.
    No init found, Can't access tty; job control turned off (initramfs)

    What makes no sense is that if I disconnect the drive A, and reboot the Debian drive using the F12 key, it automatically repairs itself and works again.

    I am still sort of new to Linux, and am doing all this to try and learn something. I'm not sure why the Debian boot-loader didn't see my ubuntu install on the other drive and reported windows7 as vista.
    I'm not sure how to approach this issue atm, and everything I'm finding on the net is not relevant to the issue. After all, I'm booting Debian from it's own drive so how could the other drive be interfering and causing Debian to loose it's paths when the other drive is plugged in?

  2. #2
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    I would check /boot/grub/device.map and try if some changes might solve the problem.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    Question

    Hello tornow

    I think what happened was, when I installed Debian, I only had one drive in, and now that I've plugged the other [A] drive with win7/Ubuntu, the drive number assignments have changed.
    I was able to get grub to see all three operating systems using:
    Code:
    sudo update-grub2
    But when I boot into the Debian drive [B], it's still giving me the missing paths, can't mount, and the other errors mentioned above. So I'm thinking I some how need to reset the drive assignments, but I'm not sure how. Someone mentioned to also uninstall grub from drive B, but I don't think that's what causing these errors. The drive number assignments (hdX,Y) have changed now that I've added the original drive with windows/Ubuntu. I'm not sure how to fix this atm.

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    Grub2 gives me some trouble too. As far i know it is not one does things wrong, but it simply has got problems with operating system on different drives.

    You may replace grub2 with grub-legacy, but i don't know about a good and reliable how-to, and it might be very time-consuming. I can't post a how-to, you screw things and ask: "Why did you tell me". If you want to try search for "how to replace grub2 by grub-legacy".

    I don't know how the entries for Windows in grub2 do look like. If there are entries by-uuid (a very, very long string), make sure they are correct (fdisk -l /dev/disk/by-uuid). I think the windows entries look just like before (grub-legacy), but you might check that.

    The best might be to post the output of:
    /boot/grub/grub.cfg
    /boot/grub/device.map
    fdisk -l
    ls /dev/disk/by-uuid.

    Its difficult. Or it might be, it also might work like a charme.
    My posts are just some ideas what i would try. Take care.

  5. #5
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    by the way, there is nothing important on the computer which I'm running Debian. I'm really just using that system to experiment, and later turn it into a dedicated game sever.
    But as far as the issue I mentioned, I know the drive number designation got mixed up once I added the new drives, because if I remove the others, the drive with Debian gets assigned back to (0) and Debian rebuilds itself.

    It's pretty crazy why the boot loader, or OS can't adapt to the change. But if I can figure out how to change it manually that would be a good thing to know.

  6. #6
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    Question

    I'm kind of curious why know one mentioned checking the fstab file?
    Apparently Debian assigns itself to the "controller host number" when it is installed. If you move the drive, it can't mount itself, and all the paths get mixed up.
    When I moved the Debian drive from SATA 1 back to SATA 0, and assigned the boot priority in the BIOS to boot my Ubuntu drive first, and then the Debian drive, Ubu worked, win7 worked, and the Debian drive rebuilt itself when I booted that as well.

    The question now is, why can't Debian adjust to a new host controller number? Ubuntu and Windows7 had no issue when I moved it's drive from controller 0 to 1.

    I'm wondering something; If the fstab file is updated automatically when you move a drive, then it must not be an issue with the fstab file. So then where is the setting to control the actual controller number assignment? I'm assuming the fstab file is only used for mounting assignments, and has nothing to do with the controller assignment at the hardware level.

    Thank you.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    /etc/fstab is not automatically updated, Ubuntu uses UUID for fstab entries see here with the links at the bottom of the page providing enough information for you to get things working.

    If you are still struggling then boot Debian and post the output of
    Code:
    ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    cat /etc/fstab
    and someone should be able to post modifications to fstab.

    The -l has a small L rather than a one

  8. #8
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    Hello Jonathan183
    I'm really a neebee with this stuff so please bear with me.

    Ok,

    The link you sent me was the Ubuntu site, and from what I understand UUID is a new drive manager for "Ubuntu". However, I was having this issue with Debian server, 5.04, a completely different distro, headless install. In any case, here is my fstab file from Debian:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    /dev/sda1 / ext3 errors=remount-ro 0 1
    /dev/sda5 none swap sw 0 0
    /dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    Please note however, that whats strange is: notice how /dev/sda1 points to a (ro) read only device. I don't see my primary drive, yet the drive with Debian "was" on sada1 when I acquired this fstab information.
    By the way, just to be clear, the other day I moved the Debian distro drive back to sata 0, and the problem got fixed, and although I had to move the drive that contained Win7/ and Ubuntu to sata 1, they both were able to adapt. Probably because Ubuntu uses the new UUID. I don't think Debian uses that. btw, I did run an update command for grub and it sees all three OSes. Grub in on the drive with Windows7 and Ubuntu, and is the first boot drive on sda1. Debian is on 0.

    I think I got lucky because Win7/ and Ubuntu were able to adjust to the change when I moved the drive, but Debian server had to stay where it was.

    Or is it possible to edit the Fstab file to point the operating system drive to a new controller if I had to in the future? I know that ubuntu page you sent me said you can edit that file, but does the fstab file pertain to mouthing devices at the hardware controller level?

  9. #9
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waveform View Post
    The link you sent me was the Ubuntu site, and from what I understand UUID is a new drive manager for "Ubuntu"....
    In any case, here is my fstab file from Debian:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
    ...
    /dev/sda1 / ext3 errors=remount-ro 0 1
    ...

    Please note however, that whats strange is: notice how /dev/sda1 points to a (ro) read only device.
    You can find uuid values by running
    Code:
    ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    Debian supports uuid and so do many other distros, its not an Ubuntu unique thing

    sda1 is being mounted rw errors=remount-ro means if there are errors it is remounted read only, try
    Code:
    man mount
    and check the mount options for ext2 section.

    We need the ls command output before we can advise on entry changes, but fstab entry will look something like
    Code:
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/uuid_value_goes_here / ext3 errors=remount-ro 0 1

  10. #10
    Just Joined! waveform's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183 View Post
    You can find uuid values by running
    Code:
    ls /dev/disk/by-uuid -l
    Debian supports uuid and so do many other distros, its not an Ubuntu unique thing
    Hi Jonathan
    Using the command above, I'm getting all the UUID numbers, which look like checksum number strings, but there is no information in front or at the back of these lines that specify what drives they belong to. In other words, I don't see any device nodes. It's just strings..i.e.

    All I see are 4 lines that look like this:
    4a4e4286-1ec2-43fb-8896-ff4fa34ee87c
    by the way, I wanted to mention once more; when i moved the Debian drive to it's original location a few days ago, the problem seemed to be fixed. I'm just going through these instructions to learn how this works.

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