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I have installed Debian 5.0.6 (three times) but despite a seemingly smooth and problemfree process erach time, when I boot up I run into a black screen with an "Out ...
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  1. #1
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    Out of Range problem in new Debian 5.0.6 install


    I have installed Debian 5.0.6 (three times) but despite a seemingly smooth and problemfree process erach time, when I boot up I run into a black screen with an "Out of Range" message.

    I can find no means of setting this during the installation process, and I certainly cannot do it subsequently on a blank screen.

    I installed for dual boot with Windows XP, but I can no longer access this either, as Debian seems to have buggered this up as well, with another black screen, saying that I need to reinstall the Windows system32\hal.dll file.

    The video card is Nvidia, I can't remember exactly which one, but it is just about 18 months old, and Ubuntu and Fedora, which I had tried out before running into different problems with them, had no problem with.

    The main difference between this installation and the Ubuntu/Fedora ones is that this time I tried the dualboot setup. I didn't really intend to, but Debian said at some point that it would not be touching the Windows boot record and I let it go as I couldn't see any way of formatting the drive. I assume this means that windows is still on the hd.

    The CPU is an AMD64, and I dl'ed the relevant version of Debian.

    Has anyone any suggestions?

    David

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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Hi and Welcome !

    I run into a black screen with an "Out of Range" message.
    Installer has not configured your Monitor correctly and has used wrong Refresh Rates. Monitor is refresh rates are out of range.

    If you have LiveCD of any Linux distro, boot up from it, mount / partition of Debian and edit its /etc/X11/xorg.conf file.
    If you don't know Refresh Rates supported by your Monitor, set Generic Refresh rates in Monitor section of xorg.conf.
    Code:
    HorizSync 31.0 - 70.0
    VertRefresh 50 - 160
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    I d'led Knoppix Live cd, but the computer just ignores it and goes straight into the grub window with the choices of OS, ie Debian and Windows.

    I then tried reinstalling Debian. Just into the install, I found that there is a range of resolutions offered.

    The page says;
    undefined video mode number: 314

    It then lists 7 resolutions ranging from F00 which is 80X25 (I assume this is 1280 x 1024, which is what I was running Windows at) up to F06 which is 80X60 (which I assume is the highest)

    I tried What I think is the lowest (80X25), then the highest (80X60), then one in the middle.

    The result was still the 'Out of Range' message.

    David

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    I then d'led and burnt a liveUbuntu disc. Using it I can navigate to the etc/x11 folder on the Debian partition.

    There is an xorg.conf file there all right but it is read-only,so I cannot edit it.

    But it does say 'Edit this file with caution' so obviously it can be done.

    I tried to get to it using the Ubuntu terminal, but filled 2 or 3 screens with user and root commands to no avail. Not surprising, really, since this is the land of 'here be dragons' for me...

    David

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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You can edit file using sudo in command line or gksu for Gedit.
    Press Alt+F2 and type this
    Code:
    gksu gedit
    It will open Gedit with root privileges. Open xorg.conf file in Gedit.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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    Smile

    I found a partial solution on another forum.

    Ctrl Alt - or +; (that's minus or plus, and you must use the numeric keyboard) will increase or decrease the resolution.

    But it is only a partial solution. When I increased the resolution as far as it would go using this method, the desktop image was still too big for the screen, although the resolution itself was acceptable.

    No doubt this could be quickly and easily sorted out by a Linux expert, but as you know by now that is what I am not. So I have come to the conclusion that life is too short, I am too busy and Linux too opaque for me to waste another three or four weeks trying to get what is really only a basic minimum level of performance. I don't want to think what it might be like to look for anything more demanding.

    Here followeth a mild rant...

    I have tried three distros, and each time ran into a brick wall right at the outset. Ubuntu woudn't grub, Fedora wouldn't boot, and you have seen the results of the Debian foray.

    I am far from being computer illiterate, having learned a lot over the years keeping the Redmond Wreck on the road, so anything Mr Gates chooses to throw at me holds no terrors. But at least in the fifteen years that I have been involved with it, I cannot remember ever a case where Windows failed to achieve the minimal requirement of at least booting properly after a fresh install.

    I gave each Linux distro my best shot, blundering through the forums, and groping through the digital fog over a period of three weeks or so, but now I must concede defeat. I don't doubt for a second that in the right hands, Linux is a first class product, but I, like millions of others, do not possess such hands. The Linux hyperbole is still premature, and until the OS works straight out of the box, and until it has a fully functional GUI, it will continue to be perceived as a specialist and somewhat esoteric product (which I strongly suspect is what a lot of Linuxistas would prefer)

    So I suppose I will have to put up with Windows and its viral subversions a while longer ...

    Anyway, thank you for your time and your responses. Perhaps our paths will cross again

    David

    PS It would be interesting to know just how many people like myself have conscientously tried Linux, only to give up because of fundamental flaws similar to those I encountered.

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    Just Joined! waves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daithi View Post
    I then d'led and burnt a liveUbuntu disc. Using it I can navigate to the etc/x11 folder on the Debian partition.

    There is an xorg.conf file there all right but it is read-only,so I cannot edit it.

    But it does say 'Edit this file with caution' so obviously it can be done.

    I tried to get to it using the Ubuntu terminal, but filled 2 or 3 screens with user and root commands to no avail. Not surprising, really, since this is the land of 'here be dragons' for me...

    David
    Hi David,

    I have had all the problems you are having with linux so can sympathise with you. devils_casper is spot on with the monitor issue. I would have a guess that you weren't root on the live cd which was why your drive was read only.

    The best bit about using linux is when you have a problem which seems insurmountable and then stumbling across the right solution, suddenly that massive problem is gone and with hindsight and armed with the right knowledge it all becomes much easier.

    Going from windoze to linux is a great thing and once you get a system running you'll never want to go back. The solution is always out there, stick with it.

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