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asif@home-a0cdf9af14:~$ su Password: home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif# apt-get install ntfsprogs ntfs-3g Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done E: Couldn't find package ntfsprogs home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif# apt-get install ntfs-3g Reading package ...
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  1. #11
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    asif@home-a0cdf9af14:~$ su
    Password:
    home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif# apt-get install ntfsprogs ntfs-3g
    Reading package lists... Done
    Building dependency tree
    Reading state information... Done
    E: Couldn't find package ntfsprogs
    home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif# apt-get install ntfs-3g
    Reading package lists... Done
    Building dependency tree
    Reading state information... Done
    E: Couldn't find package ntfs-3g
    home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif#


    It does not work

  2. #12
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Well, with Debian 5.0, you should not need to install the ntfs packages - it should handle ntfs discs out-of-the-box. Have you tried creating a mount point and mounting the file system directly? IE:
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs /dev/sdxn mount-point
    where /dev/sdxn is the partition ID for the ntfs partition you want to mount, and mount-point is the empty directory you have created for the mount point.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Well, with Debian 5.0, you should not need to install the ntfs packages - it should handle ntfs discs out-of-the-box. Have you tried creating a mount point and mounting the file system directly? IE:
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs /dev/sdxn mount-point
    where /dev/sdxn is the partition ID for the ntfs partition you want to mount, and mount-point is the empty directory you have created for the mount point.
    home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif# mount -t ntfs /dev/sdxn mount-point
    mount: mount point mount-point does not exist
    home-a0cdf9af14:/home/asif#

  4. #14
    Linux User Manko10's Avatar
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    That means that you have to create the folder "mount-point". mount-point is just a placeholder for the name of the directory you want to use for mounting the device.
    Refining Linux Advent calendar: 24 Outstanding ZSH Gems

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manko10 View Post
    That means that you have to create the folder "mount-point". mount-point is just a placeholder for the name of the directory you want to use for mounting the device.
    I did that with :

    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/hda1 /media/software

    But when I restart my pc all of them become un-mounted again . How to fix that
    Last edited by asifnaz; 12-09-2010 at 08:02 AM.

  6. #16
    Linux User Manko10's Avatar
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    To automatically mount it on boot, you have to edit your /etc/fstab.
    But this is very basic knowledge. You should definitely read about mounting on Linux, you'll find a lot on Google.
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  7. #17
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Assuming your NTFS file systems are on /dev/sdb and the partition you want to mount is the first partition. It may be partition 2 if the disc has a recovery partition. To find out, run the command sudo fdisk -l and see which device has NTFS partition types.
    Code:
    sudo su
    cd /mnt
    mkdir ntfiles
    mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb1 /mnt/ntfiles
    It may be that you need to use -t ntfs-3g instead, if the above mount command fails.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #18
    Just Joined! zeneknath's Avatar
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    Post try this

    asifnaz

    as root create directory as

    mkdir /media/sda1
    mkdir /media/sda2

    Follow these steps..

    sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g

    Then afterwards you can now execute:
    Code:

    sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/sda1 -o defaults,umask=0

    Then if all goes well, u can now save the file in your /etc/fstab to make permanent.

    sudo gedit /etc/fstab

    Add the following line at the bottom of the file

    /dev/sda1 /media/sda1 ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0

    Save the file.



    IF THIS Doesn't work

    Force Mount it !

    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/sda1 -o force


    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda2 /media/sda2 -o force

    hope it works
    right!

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