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Hi, I am an advanced Windows user with a pretty good knowledge of computer hardware and am thinking of using Debian Linux on my next computer. I don't mind the ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Dec 2004
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    Debian configuration tools


    Hi,

    I am an advanced Windows user with a pretty good knowledge of computer hardware and am thinking of using Debian Linux on my next computer. I don't mind the one-time effort to set it up, especially since I've seen the screenshots and it doesn't look difficult as long as you know what hardware you have.

    However, I am wondering if Debian has evolved to the point where once it is set up there is a GUI front end for everything and there is rarely if ever a need to touch configuration files or command lines unless you want to. Is it as highly evolved in this regard as say, Mandrake or SuSE, or is it more on the level of Slackware? I mention these distros because those are the ones I have experience with.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
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    Nov 2002
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    61
    Well I wouldn't say everything but most apps have a front-end so that you don't have to edit config files directly with an editor. I've been using Linux for well over a year now and I've tried a few distros out but debian is one I plan to stick with. Red Hat and other distros include gui utilities for some tasks like starting and stopping services but I'm sure there are some gui frontends out there for debian that will do the same. I had the same goal in mind of not touching the command line and I could for the most part if I wanted to but you soon learn that the CLI is much faster and eventually easier than running a gui. It's really up to you and what you plan to run on your system. If you have a portable MP3 player, depending on the brand, you might be forced to use a comman line tool to access the device. But, the majority of portable players out there have a gui interface app/frontend for Linux.

    One other point is the package manager in debian is much better than RedHat, Mandrake, etc. If you wanted to say upgrade Gnome, debian's package manager can handle it but forget trying to use RedHat's RPM manager to pull this off. Not happening.

    I'm bored at work if you can't tell.
    My 2 cents,
    bd

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