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Hello there, I seem to be having issues with Debian on a fresh install. This is my first time using an official Debian distro, I am used to Ubuntu, which ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! mkoster's Avatar
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    Question Fresh install cannot get default route


    Hello there, I seem to be having issues with Debian on a fresh install. This is my first time using an official Debian distro, I am used to Ubuntu, which is of Debian origins, but its not quite the same.

    My issue is that I am trying to install Debian, and update it to become a router, however before I get there I need to make sure everything is installed, which means I need to attach it to the net INSIDE the network. When I installed it got the IP via DHCP without issue, but did not get a default route.

    Here is now our network is layed out.

    We have Rapier 24i switch which has 3 networks:
    192.168.1.0/24 (DHCP provided by Windows Server 2003 at 192.168.1.5, switch is 192.168.1.2)
    192.168.2.0/24 (DHCP provided by switch)
    192.168.3.0/24 (DHCP provided by switch)

    Gateway to the internet is 192.168.3.1 which is the gateway I will be replacing with the new server.

    Now the port available to me at the location I need is on the 192.168.1.0/24 network. All the windows machines are able to get on the net without issue using the 192.168.3.1 gateway, however as I mentioned, Debian is not picking up the route.

    I can ping any machine on the 192.168.1.0/24 network, but I cannot ping the gateway. I also unfortunately do not know the correct route commands to get it talk to the 192.168.3.1 gateway.

    The windows systems show 2 gateways,
    192.168.3.1, 192.168.1.2

    (in that order), how do I make Debian talk to the net (the outside world)?

  2. #2
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    I am not sure how you have your Windows machines configured or any special VLAN'ing done on the switch. But for the standard TCP/IP stack, your default gateway *should* be on the same network that the node is attached to - that's what makes it a gateway. IE, if the machine is on the 192.168.1.0/24 network, a 'gateway' of 192.168.3.1 is not on the same network and hence cannot be reached without using...a gateway/network route. (How do you send packets from your network to this other network without a network route between them?) If the switch is 192.168.1.2, I'd expect that IP may work for the gateway address.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! mkoster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HROAdmin26 View Post
    I am not sure how you have your Windows machines configured or any special VLAN'ing done on the switch. But for the standard TCP/IP stack, your default gateway *should* be on the same network that the node is attached to - that's what makes it a gateway. IE, if the machine is on the 192.168.1.0/24 network, a 'gateway' of 192.168.3.1 is not on the same network and hence cannot be reached without using...a gateway/network route. (How do you send packets from your network to this other network without a network route between them?) If the switch is 192.168.1.2, I'd expect that IP may work for the gateway address.
    That seems to have worked, its just odd as the Windows DHCP seems to put out 2 default router setting for windows (which is what I was going by) which lists 192.168.3.1 then 192.168.1.2 as the gateways... The 192.168.3.1 shouldn;t even be there.

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