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The command used to format a new partition /dev/hda6 with ext3 file system (1 block = 1024 bytes, inode = 512 bytes)?...
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  1. #1
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    how to format


    The command used to format a new partition /dev/hda6 with ext3 file system (1 block = 1024 bytes, inode = 512 bytes)?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    Use mkfs.ext3 and check mkfs.ext3 --help option.
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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Are you sure its /dev/hda6? hdX device name has been discontinued a long time back. Execute fdisk -l command with root privileges to check exact device name assigned to your Hard disk.
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    /dev/hdX has not been discontinued

    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Are you sure its /dev/hda6? hdX device name has been discontinued a long time back. Execute fdisk -l command with root privileges to check exact device name assigned to your Hard disk.
    I have to make a clarification. The /dev/hdX device name has not been discontinued as that notation belongs to IDE Disks, by the other side, SATA disks use /dev/sdX notation.

    So, you should use the "mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdX" command if you have IDE disks, or change the parameter for /dev/sdX if you have SATA disks.

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    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scampuzano
    I have to make a clarification. The /dev/hdX device name has not been discontinued as that notation belongs to IDE Disks, by the other side, SATA disks use /dev/sdX notation.
    iirc, Latest kernels don't use separate notations for IDE or SATA disks now. sd is being used for all types of disks.

    I have a few old machines have IDE disks running Debian. Latest kernels ( I think 2.6.x onwards) have assigned sd device names to the disks in those machines.
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  7. #6
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Latest kernels ( I think 2.6.x onwards) have assigned sd device names to the disks in those machines.
    That's the way I remember it as well. I guess if someone were to be running a really old kernel, the hdX would still apply.
    oz

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    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    It depends on what disk driver you have selected. The PATA/SATA driver can drive both SATA and IDE disks but always gives them sd names. I think all stock kernels use this now. But if you build your own kernel and select the old IDE driver, you get hd names.
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