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hello forum, i am new here and hope i am in right place. i have worked with Linux off and on for past 15 years or so but not in ...
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  1. #1
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    RraspberryPi


    hello forum, i am new here and hope i am in right place. i have worked with Linux off and on for past 15 years or so but not in last year until yesterday when i got a RaspberryPi in my mailbox. i have recently also suffered 2 strokes and seem to have forgotten (or maybe never knew) some stuff. i have a couple of questions regarding this Pi. first of all - it's supercool - size of a credit card and for ~$25 how can it be wrong? i have old HD tv with no HDMI port - without HDMI--->DVI cable i was forced to analog mode (no VGA support??) after resetting res to 800x600 in config.txt it was passable, but obvious solution (other than cable) is to use remote control (SSH). the SSH is already installed in the .img so all i need is putty on other end. now to what i forgot and question 1: i guess this is not Linux actually - but sorta is - i have a router connected to cable modem (or other way around) and second router attached to first router and the Pi attached to second router. the box i want to use to control Pi is attached to first router (wireless). do i build some kind of route table to connect the wireless box to the Pi? i could just run a cable from second router to wireless box - then they see each other, but i am am interested in the routing solution. question 2: how do i make the Pi visible to the world via web? (maybe related to question 1?) thanks in advance all...

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Your routers also act as firewalls. The one that faces the Internet will need to have some ports opened up and forwarded to the Pi's IP address. Since you will want the Pi to be visible to the WWW, you will need to assign it a static IP address, not use a dhcp-provided one. You should be able to look at the router configuration web page and tell which address range is used for dhcp address assignments, and use one not in that range for your static IP address (except for x.y.z.1 and .254 or .255). It may be necessary to change the dhcp address range if it is taking up the entire 255 address range for the subnet x.y.z.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    thanks for your reply, and i was glad to get email so advising as well. it's no problem to assign a static ip to the Pi. i can do that in the ifconfig file. the ip address on the outside of the router also has a static ip address (as assigned by cable company). now since there are 2 routers i can set the second router outside address to be assigned a static ip by hardcoding the MAC address in the first router setup (along with the desired ip)? assuming i can figure out how to do it in the router configs, then i open up say port 80? to allow http traffic on both routers. if i then stick an index.html web page on the Pi will it be visible from outside using the external ip as domain name? or is there additional config that needs to be done on the Pi? i realize performance will suck, the whole thing with the Pi is academic not practical. just think, a whole closet of servers in a shoe box. thanks again for your reply, sorry if the question was more about routers than linux.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Are both routers facing the internet, or just one of them. If just one of them, then reconfigure the other router to just be a bridge. Set up the one facing the internet to be the provider of dhcp addresses for your mobile devices. Devices that are always on and attached only to your local network should have static ip's assigned to them. You do that on the devices/machines themselves. Finally, you need to forward the ports you want for your Pi, such as 80 (http), 8080 (https), on the internet-facing router. That's where the static IP you configure your Pi to use will be referenced as the end-point for those forwarded ports. So, people connect to the static IP on the router that your ISP gave you, on port 80 or 8080.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    thanks a bunch - ithink i got it in my pea brain now.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arwar View Post
    thanks a bunch - ithink i got it in my pea brain now.
    NP. Let us know how it goes and we'll work with you to get it functional. If you need, post screen shots of your router config pages.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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