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Hy, the running system on the virtual machine is debian. It seems that the cpu setting is dedicated, not virtual. Is it possible to avoid the automatically shared setting as ...
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  1. #1
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    Virtual host: avoiding autmatically settings on dedicatet cpu settings


    Hy,
    the running system on the virtual machine is debian. It seems that the cpu setting is dedicated, not virtual.

    Is it possible to avoid the automatically shared setting as a virtual host user?

    I just get 4 to 8% of the max. power. Iīm feeling scammed by them.

    a setting of one of the most used process is:
    nice -n -20 stdbuf -i G -o G ionice -c 1 -n 0 -t taskset -c 0-5 ./process & disown
    what is to modify? Iīv got 8GB RAM but I donīt need that much - I need cpu!


    thanks.
    Last edited by non_bot; 06-15-2013 at 06:25 AM.

  2. #2
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    the running system on the virtual machine is debian. It seems that the cpu setting is dedicated, not virtual.
    If by dedicated, you mean the CPUs the host can make available to the guest, then yes. I've got a quad and can assign up to 3 CPUs to the VM.

    Is it possible to avoid the automatically shared setting as a virtual host user
    Which shared settings?

    I just get 4 to 8% of the max. power. Iīm feeling scammed by them.
    Can you clarify?

    Might help to know the host OS... distro, version, desktop environment.

    Also, the output of

    Code:
     sudo cat /var/log/dmesg | grep CPU0
    and

    Code:
     sudo cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | grep Chipset

  3. #3
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    Is it possible to avoid the automatically shared setting as a virtual host user.
    -> Which shared settings?
    The cpu is physically on the server and the server contains some virtual hosts. I mean the distribution of the whole cpu power for the virtual hosts. Itīs not a clouded-cpu like the RAM --> I would like to use a bit more

    I just get 4 to 8% of the max. power. Iīm feeling scammed by them.
    ->Can you clarify?
    If I type "top" I get the information that the process is running with for about 30% of my virtual host power. If I take a look at the providers cpanel for virtual host users itīs for about 6% only. If here is a usage of 75% I would be satisfied. For a few moments it has taken 80%... That was by the beginning of usage. I donīt have changed any settings.


    Might help to know the host OS... distro, version, desktop environment.
    No, I donīt know.
    Also, the output of
    Code:
     sudo cat /var/log/dmesg | grep CPU0
    No output.

    Code:
     sudo cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | grep Chipset
    There is no such file. I could find this only:
    alternatives.log daemon.log kern.log messages syslog.3.gz
    apache2 debug lastlog news user.log
    apt dmesg lpr.log samba wtmp
    aptitude dpkg.log mail.err syslog xconsole.log
    auth.log faillog mail.info syslog.0
    boot fontconfig.log mail.log syslog.1.gz
    btmp fsck mail.warn syslog.2.gz

  4. #4
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    My error on the cat commands; on my desktop OS the first shows the brand/model CPU and the other shows the GPU/driver. Shoulda just asked which CPU.

    As I understand it, your host OS is a web server with several guest systems, one of which is Debian. Your question is about allocating more CPU power to the VMs.

    If I type "top" I get the information that the process is running with for about 30% of my virtual host power.
    Top reports current use, not total capability... if it shows 30% it means only 30% of the CPU's processing power is being allocated (used by the host) to run that process.

    When starting a second VM, it'll ramp up (the 80%) until the VM is running, after which it settles down to whatever is used/needed for both VMs. Run something CPU-intensive in one of the VMs and you'll see top's percentage of CPU use for that process ramp up.

    Dunno your core settings but on a server with multiple VMs, I understand it's better to assign only one core per VM. A single-core guest can execute instructions as soon as one host core becomes available. With multiple guests using multiple cores, one or more of the guest VMs may hafta wait until the number of the VM's assigned cores become available from the host.
    Last edited by fanderal; 06-16-2013 at 04:22 PM. Reason: clarity

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