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Hello, I'm having some problems with my hard drive and some times when I'm using it too much it just turns off. A few days ago that happend again while ...
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  1. #1
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    Hard Drive problems


    Hello, I'm having some problems with my hard drive and some times when I'm using it too much it just turns off.
    A few days ago that happend again while it was installing a cloud software the problem now is that the hard drive doesnt start up(I presume its because some data as broken) how can I recover the data?


    tks, joaogl

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Does it spin up? If not, then you will have to send it to a data recovery service, which can be quite costly. If it does spin up, then try booting from a USB drive and see if it appears in /dev (such as /dev/sda). If it does, then try to run fsck on it. If it doesn't appear in /dev, then it may be a problem with the controller. In any case, you need to determine if it is the drive, or the controller that is bad before you decide anything else.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    It does spin, it appears as /dev/sda1 and I've tried to mount it as tmfs and it says its empty ... something wrong?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. Good news so far. The drive is functional. You need to see if it can be repaired. Don't try to mount it, but first run "fsck -f /dev/sda1" and then "fsck -c -f /dev/sda1". That will first try to repair the file system, and then scan it for bad blocks and try to repair the file system again. If it still cannot be accessed/mounted, or fsck comes up with too many errors, then your drive may be fubar. If the drive is overheating, then it may shut down again, so if the first fsck finishes, shut the system down and let it cool off before the second iteration.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #5
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    So far so goo is doing his thing I'll let u know the result when it ends. tks

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joaogl
    some times when I'm using it ... it just turns off... that happend again. the problem now is that the hard drive doesnt start up
    Or very slow to boot to the desktop? These same problems showed up on the computer of a woman I work with where I volunteer. My advice was to back up all personal stuff ASAP. She did that the next day. Ten days later the computer no longer booted.

    One or more bad sectors had developed on her hard drive. If a sector is bad, it means the sector has begun to wear out, that it's magnetic state is deteriorating. Once a sector starts going bad, the software on that sector becomes increasingly more difficult to read, and eventually impossible to read.

    I brought her a live distro with persistence on a USB drive so she could still do her email; I took her HD with me. I used TestDisk from the PartedMagic utility distro and couldn't fix it. I also downloaded a small iso image from the HD mfg's website, burned it to a CD and tried their tools. They didn't work either. The HD was 6 years old. When the new HD showed up last week, I reinstalled the system and copied over her saved files.

    Hope it isn't, but just saying this may be a possibility. Good luck!

  8. #7
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    Its back to live! tks for the help it worked.

    fanderal, thats not my problem... the problem on my computer is power issues but I just ordered a USB Power Hub to avoid all this again...

    now I would like to backup all my data can someone tell me a good program?

  9. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    There are a number of backup strategies. Which of these is best depends upon your situation. For a full system backup (saving all data and programs, etc) then you want to do a bit-image copy of the drive and/or partition(s) to an external device. I use the dd command for that. If you need incremental backups of changed data, then rsync is a good tool. You can use it to back up your data across a network, or to an external device. I use both methods. For example, I do a bit-image backup of my entire system disc before I do a major upgrade. That way, if it blows up (has happened to me in the past), then I can restore the old image and be back to where I started. The rsync method is best for making regular backups of changed files. Read the man pages for more information - dd and rsync.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  10. #9
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    Glad to hear it was something else and ya got it working. I use rsync for backups. It's a CLI app and also packaged with a GUI interface in grsync.

  11. #10
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    thank you for help

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