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I recently attempted to install Debian using a live cd, with RAID 1 configured. I booted with the live cd, and managed to configure raid, and made raid active. However, ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    105

    Disk error


    I recently attempted to install Debian using a live cd, with RAID 1 configured.
    I booted with the live cd, and managed to configure raid, and made raid active.

    However, to install debian, we need to run the automated scripts. It manages to install debian, but it always has problem creating the grub directory and menu.lst. I reinstalled grub, and menu.lst gets installed.

    The solution will be complete once we boot with the hard disk, and so debian would be installed. However, this is not the case for me. When I boot the server with hard disk, this is the error that I get :

    HTML Code:
    Non-system disk or disk error
    I ran boot-repair cd to troubleshoot this problem, and this was the solution given :

    HTML Code:
    RAID detected. You may want to retry after installing the [mdadm] packages.
    sudo apt-get install -y --force-yes mdadm --no-install-recommends
    When I clicked on OK to close this message box, another message
    appeared, which was :

    HTML Code:
    No active RAID.
    How do I resolve this problem?

    Also, in order to resolve this problem, I wiped out all the partitions and raid in the server, and reconfigured everything from scratch. However this still did not resolve the problem.

    My senior system admin believes that the problem is still with grub, whereby it is not installing
    MBR correctly.

    But what shall I do to repair grub, when I have tried fixing everything possibly I could with it?

    Some of the steps I took include :

    Put in the Clonezilla CD to boot up the Test Machine.

    Create a directory named newinstall

    mkdir /newinstall

    Mount all the hda to /newinstall

    mount -t ext3 /dev/hda1 /newinstall
    mount -t ext3 /dev/hda6 /newinstall/var
    mount -t ext3 /dev/hda7 /newinstall/usr
    mount -t ext3 /dev/hda8 /newinstall/tmp
    mount -t ext3 /dev/hda9 /newinstall/opt

    Edit /etc/system.sh file.

    vi /etc/setting.sh

    Change the ${DEVICE} to /dev/hda according to the code stated below:
    HTML Code:
        ORIGINAL VERSION 	        EDITED VERSION
        export DEVICE=/dev/sda 	export DEVICE=/dev/md
    Downloading /usr/local...

    rsync -avz --delete --progress deployment::installbase/usr-local.tar /newinstall/tmp/

    Installing /usr/local...

    cd /newinstall/usr/local
    tar -xf /newinstall/tmp/usr-local.tar

    Creating block devices...

    cp -a /dev/hda* /newinstall/dev/

    Install grub

    chroot /newinstall /root/new_debian_install/installer/install_grub.sh

    install config files

    chroot /newinstall /root/new_debian_install/installer/update_system.sh
    chroot /newinstall /root/new_debian_install/installer/nta_rc.sh

    Removes the floppy devices from the knoppix fs so grub will work

    rm -rf /dev/fd*

    Installing grub part 2...

    grub-install --no-floppy --recheck --root-directory=/newinstall /dev/md0
    Last edited by anaigini45; 01-22-2014 at 02:47 AM.

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    21
    Because you are attempting to do this with a RAID, ymmv from what I can add. I have no experience installing raids.

    However, I do have some observations.

    First, you are using the Clonezilla liveCD, but trying to install Debian? What happened to using the Debian installer itself?

    2nd: Grub - currently comes in two flavors - version 1, and version 2. Version 1 is labeled v0.98, actually, if i recall. V1.97, 1.98, and 2 are Grub 2. If you are using something like Supergrub it will not repair Grub 2, and you will end up unable to boot (unless they have updated it since I last used SuperGrub). If, on the other hand, you are copying all the Debian live CD installation files, and using their Grub install script, I would think you should be ok.

    From what you wrote, it just wasn't clear to me, and if you are somehow trying to fix the grub by installing the wrong grub version, you are likely to end up with an OS that won't load.

    If it were me, I'd start from scratch with the Debian install CD. Good luck - and if you've made progress - let us know. Your post is a week old now.

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