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  1. #1

    Uninstall and Completely Remove OS (Debian)


    So I have had Debian installed on my other laptop for about 5 years without even using it, and just got on it and messed it up by doing some update that didn't work. Long story short, it completely removed the touchpad functionality (USB mouse works) and whenever I'm in the Desktop (KDE) and click anything, the menu is all blank. No icons are in the bottom right corner, no network connectivity at all.

    I just want to wipe this system and use the install disc to reinstall, how would I go about doing that? I have the disc, which is just a DVD-R I burned an ISO of Debian too years ago, but I don't care about the info on the HD, nothing of importance on it.

    I tried to press ESC at boot up and it took me to options, and on the boot menu it just lists the current Debian OS. How do I delete that or boot a fresh install from the disc?

  2. #2
    So you're saying you have a CD of Debian that's 5 years old? Not a good choice as you need to get a modern copy. Here's a link to get one that includes non-free firmware:

    Index of /cdimage/unofficial/non-free/cd-including-firmware/8.2.0-live+nonfree

    Then once the new CD/USB is created, you'll have to go into BIOS and change your boot options to boot from CD or USB as the first option.

    If what you're saying is you have the Windows install disk, you still have to go into BIOS and change the boot options to CD first.

    When you boot whatever OS you want to install just partition/format/overwrite what's on the disk...
    Are you a clueless Kali user? If you can't get Kali running on your own, it ain't the right distro for you.

  3. #3
    Well everytime I boot it just says the Debian that currently installed, but I can try what you said. I'm putting it on a USB stick, but will it automatically overwrite the current partition (which is what I want), or will I have to manually delete it using fdisk?

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  5. #4
    Linux Enthusiast Steven_G's Avatar
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    If debian is the only OS the system and you don't care about it then just use any installer for any OS to overwrite it. It doesn't matter if you use ubuntu, debain, doze or whatever or CD / DVD or USB. All you have to do is tell the installer to use the whole disk. Done.

  6. #5
    I get what you're saying but the only thing I'm wondering is, why when I put the Debian disc I used to install the OS inside, it doesn't attempt to boot from it and install, it just goes right to selecting Debian Os and boots to the one installed.

    Does it have to be a different OS?

    Also if I just downloaded the ISO of like Ubuntu, will it automatically give me the option to overwrite when installing?

  7. #6
    Your machine MUST be setup to boot FIRST from CD or USB, most are defaulted to hard drive. You change this by going into your BIOS and changing the boot options. Until you do this, you could put 100 different CDs in and none would boot. No matter what OS you install, select "Use entire disk".

    I said this already in my first answer to you, perhaps you didn't read it and if so I'll gladly quit trying to help you...
    Last edited by NGIB; 11-30-2015 at 06:22 PM.
    Are you a clueless Kali user? If you can't get Kali running on your own, it ain't the right distro for you.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
    Your machine MUST be setup to boot FIRST from CD or USB, most are defaulted to hard drive. You change this by going into your BIOS and changing the boot options. Until you do this, you could put 100 different CDs in and none would boot. No matter what OS you install, select "Use entire disk".

    I said this already in my first answer to you, perhaps you didn't read it and if so I'll gladly quit trying to help you...
    I know this, maybe I didn't say this already but I have it setup to boot from CD not the hard drive.

  9. #8
    Download a fresh ISO of your choice and make a new bootable CD or USB stick. It's likely that your old CD is damaged and is of little use anyway as it's an old system.

    I haven't used a CD in years, if your computer will boot from USB - write the ISO to a USB stick as it will be faster and much more reliable...
    Are you a clueless Kali user? If you can't get Kali running on your own, it ain't the right distro for you.

  10. #9
    Linux Enthusiast Steven_G's Avatar
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    -->
    Definitely burn a new CD or USB. Depending on the quality of the original CD (read "how expensive") they are only good for ~5-10 years; and depending on how they are stored it can be a lot less.

    If you go w/ CDs and it won't boot new ones then it could be a hardware issue.

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