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  1. #1

    Is debian more faster, secure than mint?


    I barely know something outside of Windows. I have a Dell Inspiron that I use ONLY for email and surfing. Would Debian be a better choice? Also, can I download Debian and get rid of Mint after,and have Debian take over? I have VERY LITTLE,if nothing at all, knowledge on any Linux.

  2. #2
    I would recommend lmde3 if you want a debian distro. It uses debian and not ubuntu as the base and works really well. It also has more in terms of newer software in the repositories than the base debian.

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie
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    Debian, LMDE, Ubuntu, Mint?

    Quote Originally Posted by hatebreed View Post
    I would recommend lmde3 if you want a debian distro. It uses debian and not ubuntu as the base and works really well. It also has more in terms of newer software in the repositories than the base debian.
    All four of the Linux-based distributions mentioned in the title of this post: (Debian, LMDE, Ubuntu, Mint?) are very good alternatives to any commercial software.

    To put each "in their place", here is a short explanation:

    1. All four listed distributions are actually derived from Debian Linux.

    2. Ubuntu is designed to be more current (up to date with newer software) than Debian.

    3. Mint is derived from Ubuntu (and thus also derived from Debian), but is more polished and stable. Therefore, it's somewhere in between Debian and Ubuntu in terms of "new" versus simple and stable. If "simple", polished, and easy are the top criteria, then Mint may be your best choice.

    4. Nevertheless, LMDE is another Linux Mint derivative that takes another approach. It uses many of the installation and configuration features created by Mint, but uses a Debian software base instead of an Ubuntu base, so if simple and stable are important, LMDE has most of the polish of Mint, but may not include every one of the latest Linux Mint tools.

    5. Debian is not terribly difficult to try out, especially these days, where you can run it directly from a removable USB device, but the installer asks you more questions and allows the possibility of installing a greater variety of user interfaces and the support for many hardware processors.

    Bottom line: they are all fine. If any of the features matters more, or you find a specific distribution easier or better suited to your specific needs, by all means try it out. Otherwise, flip a coin and pick one; each of the distributions mentioned will be a definite improvement over any system that comes installed with 99% of the computers typically found in a store.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by sc2dave View Post
    I barely know something outside of Windows. I have a Dell Inspiron that I use ONLY for email and surfing. Would Debian be a better choice? Also, can I download Debian and get rid of Mint after,and have Debian take over? I have VERY LITTLE,if nothing at all, knowledge on any Linux.
    Debian's default interface has a bit less "polished beauty", and therefore it can be slightly faster and more efficient; you would only notice a difference if your system is a few years old, otherwise the main difference is that Mint is a bit easier to install and may "look nicer" to some people. Since Mint packages generally benefit from software that comes from Debian, Mint will (most of the time) have the same fixes available on Debian systems. There may be exceptions when last minute security issues arise. The Debian team is one of the best at researching and fixing security issues, so Debian may, in a few rare circumstances, support critical security fixes and make them available slightly sooner.

    Most of this won't matter much to a novice user; either of these systems is solid, safe, and secure.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

  6. #5
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    I recommend trying Arch linux.

    It is not newbie friendly but once you figure it out (and install it) it is very enjoyable.

    1) It will leave you with a confidant level of knowledge in the command line.

    2) If you can't install it then it will just be frustrating.

    I love it's barebones nature and it's cli.

    I am using Ubuntu on my 32 bit netbook as Arch has left 32bit behind (picked up as a fork but takes more mucking about then I have time for)

    I like Ubuntu as I can use the quake terminal, it's the cat's pijamas.

    Sent from my SM-G935W8 using Tapatalk

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