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Hi I'm a Bit of a Newbie at Technical Faults So I was hoping someone here would be so kind as to help me with my Install issue I am ...
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  1. #1
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    Debian Install issue: Kernel Panic


    Hi I'm a Bit of a Newbie at Technical Faults So I was hoping someone here would be so kind as to help me with my Install issue

    I am Trying to install Debian Woody 3.0 (kernel ver: 2.4) on to a ...

    Tandon 33/486
    Memory : 14 Mb
    HD: Western Digital 600 Mb

    To be used as a Firewall and possibly a DNS server

    I go to install From floppy and the rescue disk Works Fine however when I put the Root Disk in it come up with a string of problems,
    I know Its not a problem with the Disk because Its a new disk and freshly Written.

    Theres an Extremly large amount Of error code/messages
    until comes down to the final few messages as follows...

    code: 8b 4b fc 8b 01 85 fc 74 4d 31 c0 9c 53 fa c7 01
    <o>Kernel panic: Aiee, killing interrupt handler!
    In interrupt handler, not syncing

    As This Computer has Fairly Old Hardware I'm worried It is simply a Hardware issue like the motherboard, any Suggestions Are most appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I checked the system requirements at Debian's site and, frankly, was surprised to see that your RAM exceeds minimum specifications by 27% and your CPU is one generation more advanced than the minimum supported. (I'm trying to be upbeat, here). My guess is that you are using up too much of your resources, that is RAM. Can you trim down the kernel at all? I think maybe there might be drivers that can be installed as modules instead of compiled in the kernel, and maybe you are supporting services that you don't need. I'm not familiar with Debian, or it's install procedure, but I know Gentoo allows a 'ground up' build so you can keep the kernel trim.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  3. #3
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    drakebasher:Well from my experience with Debian, and from what I've read in his original post, I'd say his only chance at trimming the kernel would be to decompress the floppy image, recompile the kernel, recompress the floppy image, and "dd" away, which is beyond the scope of many Linux users.
    Not sure quite how much time you're willing to commit to this DR-BeSerKa
    -lakerdonald

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakerdonald
    Not sure quite how much time you're willing to commit to this DR-BeSerKa
    -lakerdonald
    Yeah, I was thinking that too, but I'd hate to kill a dream....
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  6. #5
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    Although Debian has been called the binary version of Gentoo, it's not as customizable. But it's one of the most customizables out there other than Gentoo and maybe Slack. If he's willing to commit the time, he should be just fine.

  7. #6
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    O Ok, That Confirms Theirs No serious Hardware Faults, and that I'm just working with the minimum Hardware requirements...

    I shall Now attempt to Install Debian With the Compact Version
    and take it From their,

    I must admit I'm still reasonably new to The technical side of the Installation How Hard will it be for me to add the appropriate Packages from the Compact Install?

  8. #7
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    You might try Slackware instead, if you can't get Debian going. It's a decent distro, as far as distros go anyway, and I have yet to see it not install on a computer I've tried installing it onto (this includes a few 486s).

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