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I have an HP ze2000 laptop and my sound buttons dont work aswell as there is no graphical representation to use to raise and lower my sound, My hibernate has ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! Hax-X's Avatar
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    Sound controls and hibernate are no go's :(


    I have an HP ze2000 laptop and my sound buttons dont work aswell as there is no graphical representation to use to raise and lower my sound,

    My hibernate has been a problem since day 1 no matter what distro hibernate seems to hang.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    There's a good tutorial in this link on how to get multimedia keys working. It's from the Gentoo wiki, but it applies to all distributions.
    Stand up and be counted as a Linux user!

  3. #3
    Just Joined! Hax-X's Avatar
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    alright!!!! thats an awesome tutorial but ive come to a road block....

    At "Setting up xmodmap" I have no idea what they are talking about.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    Oh, huh, maybe that's not exactly the tutorial I used when I set up my keys. They don't mention how to generate an .xmodmap file.
    Well, all you have to do is this:
    Code:
    $ xmodmap -pke > .xmodmap
    That will print your current keymap in a form that can be read as an input by xmodmap, and direct the output to a file called .xmodmap. Then you can go through your new .xmodmap file and look for key names to bind to the codes that you got from xev. If you don't see the key names you want to use, you can add them from the list of names found in /usr/lib/X11/XKeysymDB. It really doesn't matter what key name to bind a code to, as long as the key name isn't already being used. It just makes sense to use one that matches the key you're pressing.

    Once the .xmodmap is ready, you're just about done. You just have to make xmodmap run every time you log in. If you're using KDE, add a one-line script to your ~/.kde/Autostart, that looks something like this:
    Code:
    xmodmap /home/hax/.xmodmap
    Of course, you'll want to use the real path to your new .xmodmap file.
    If you're using Gnome, you could maybe put that script in /etc/gdm/PostLogin, unless Gnome has an easier way to run programs when you log in.
    Stand up and be counted as a Linux user!

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