Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
Hey guys, I'm wondering what you all do to make Firefox take on your KDE theme and appearance, and look like it really should under KDE? I love the way ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733

    [SOLVED] Making Firefox look like it should under KDE


    Hey guys, I'm wondering what you all do to make Firefox take on your KDE theme and appearance, and look like it really should under KDE? I love the way Firefox looks under Gnome, by the way.

    I'm already familiar with most of the various options for doing this task, such as QtCurve, klearlooks, the gtk-qt-engine, MetaTheme, etc, and have tried all of them multiple times but each one either doesn't blend in correctly, it slows down the browser, or it's loaded with various bugs and annoyances.

    After going through all that without any satisfactory solution, I'm now simply installing Firefox and not worrying about the themes matching, and while it doesn't look nearly as good, doing this has been giving me the best results, overall.

    Still, I'd like to have more. Is there some other option available that I'm missing?
    oz

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Yorks
    Posts
    4,393
    I use the gtk-qt-engine and then look for a firefox icon theme that matches the KDE icon theme I use (usually nuvola or crystal). This makes Firefox blend with the rest of KDE, but its not a seamless integration. The thing I hate the most is the gtk file selector. There are ways to change this, but I can't be bothered with the hassle anymore.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    For me, the best results come by using qtcurve.

    I install gtk-engines-qt (or whatever it's called on your distro). Then I install the kde and gtk qtcurve engines. I select qtcurve on kcontrol, and configure it to my likings. Then, I go to the gtk theme selector tab (it appears in kcontrol *only* if you have gtk-engines-qt installed).

    From that tab, pick qtcurve as the theme (qtcurve, not the gtk-engines-qt emulation mode). You can set the fonts there are well.

    If after that it doesn't work, maybe you are using a 64 bits distro with a precompiled 32 bit firefox (and in that case the solution would not be that trivial).

  4. #4
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Thanks for the information, guys.

    I've never tried mixing any of the different methods, but might give it a shot. Firefox 3 (beta5) takes on any gtk themes almost perfectly. It would really be nice if it could do that with qt themes.
    oz

  5. #5
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Ok, after playing with this today, I finally have a satisfactory Firefox running on KDE. I wound up installing qtcurve-kde3, qtcurve-gtk2, and gtk-chtheme, then played around with the various settings until it all blended together. It feels much snappier than it was with the gtk-qt-engine, too.

    Thanks again, guys... I reallly appreciate the input.
    oz

  6. #6
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Arghh... it's funny how after using any of these KDE/Firefox "blend in" fixes for a short while, the minor annoyances begin to show themselves. This is by far the best combination I've tried, but the only truly good blend that I've been able to achieve is with Gnome and Firefox.

    I have nothing against Gnome accept that it doesn't feel as snappy on my box as KDE does, and the Gnome-Games don't seem (in my opinion) to be of the same quality as the KDE-Games.
    oz

  7. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    Arghh... it's funny how after using any of these KDE/Firefox "blend in" fixes for a short while, the minor annoyances begin to show themselves. This is by far the best combination I've tried, but the only truly good blend that I've been able to achieve is with Gnome and Firefox.

    I have nothing against Gnome accept that it doesn't feel as snappy on my box as KDE does, and the Gnome-Games don't seem (in my opinion) to be of the same quality as the KDE-Games.
    The two toolkits are different enough. It's impossible to mimic any of them in a completely exact way on the other, a simple widget theme can't do anything better.

    In addition to that, you also need to bear in mind that firefox is not a pure gtk application either, which in turn make the things even worse. I don't think that you will get any closer unless you are willing to port firefox to use qt :P

    You can compare it to opera vs. kde: opera uses qt, but it's not a kde app, and it will never integrate into kde. Note that those browsers work on many other OSes, where kde or gnome might not be available. So, they can't be specifically tied to any of those.

    You can also check kgtk, which is an -ugly- hack that can be used to substitute the gtk file dialogs by the kde one. But it works sometimes, it doesn't some others, and it can produce very funky results, which in my opinion doesn't worth the trouble.

    Firefox is a standalone application that doesn't really depend on any desktop, so, it can't provide the level of integration that epiphany gives you on gnome or that konqueror gives you in kde.

    It's not a thing that bothers me either. I am not really a fan of uniform theming.

  8. #8
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    I've tried Opera so many times (at least a couple dozen) and can't stick with it for more than a few minutes. I loved it back when it was young and in the 6.x versions, but hate it now. It looks like crap under KDE, too, at least in my opinion.

    The perfect blending of Firefox and KDE is not as important to me as just making it not look so downright ugly. Either way, I've gone back to Firefox with no blend-in hacks and will either stick with that, or will revert to Gnome and do without KDE's games for the sake of a prettier browser.

    Thanks to all that replied.
    oz

  9. #9
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    I am not trying to convince you, but sometimes this seems to me like pure irrational phobia.

    You can use all the gnome programs under kde, and you can use the kde games under gnome as well, if that's the only thing that ties you to kde. With the size of nowadays hard drives, I can't understand what's wrong with that.

    I could understand why people refuse to do so on a source distro, where compiling things takes time. But to install the whole kde and gnome stuff in a binary distro takes minutes.

    Anyway, I suppose it's just a matter of tastes. This was just me thinking in loud voice. Everyone should always do whatever fits him/her better.


  10. #10
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    I have installed KDE, Gnome and a few WMs in my test machine and use KDE apps in Gnome/WMs or vice versa most of the time.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •