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Heeey Guys.. I just got myself Mandrake 10 Community (download version on three CD's) and i love it. It looks absolutely fantastic and works fast and really fine. Who say's ...
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  1. #11
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    Heeey Guys..

    I just got myself Mandrake 10 Community (download version on three CD's) and i love it. It looks absolutely fantastic and works fast and really fine.

    Who say's linuy isn't ready for desktop, it's easy to use, it's fast and it's stable. The GUI (KDE 3.2) is simply awesome. It's the first up to date distro i've ever tried and i believe i'll stick with it.

    The only problem is that my AMR modem PCTEL HSP56 MR doesn't work, but i'm trying and i'll continue to try until the problem is solved. Then it's gonna be my primary system.

  2. #12
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    Just curious; I've only really used Redhat/Fedora (apart from a brief period trying mandrake). What do you find really separates the distributions in terms of desktop use? Apart from easy installs, etc., what makes these distros better than another?

    Everytime I go to the sites and try to find out what a distro is all about, their blurb usually runs along the lines of selling linux in general to windows users, rather than touting the advantages of their distro over others. All the screenshots usually show the same stuff -- KDE, Gnome, Evolution, Mozilla, etc.

    I mean, Gentoo is pushing their package distribution scheme, but how is it any different to the end user than, say, yum?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lykwydchykyn
    Just curious; I've only really used Redhat/Fedora (apart from a brief period trying mandrake). What do you find really separates the distributions in terms of desktop use? Apart from easy installs, etc., what makes these distros better than another?
    Well, for me there are a few things that separate a distro. One is how it handles new software. I find that I really like Debian-based distros because once you learn how to use apt-get, installing/updating/uninstalling is a one-command process. This is similar in Gentoo with portage, except in Debian the packages aren't compiled locally (there's pros and cons to that as well).

    Everytime I go to the sites and try to find out what a distro is all about, their blurb usually runs along the lines of selling linux in general to windows users, rather than touting the advantages of their distro over others. All the screenshots usually show the same stuff -- KDE, Gnome, Evolution, Mozilla, etc.

    I mean, Gentoo is pushing their package distribution scheme, but how is it any different to the end user than, say, yum?
    As I mentioned before, Portage (Gentoo's package manager) is different from apt or yum because not only does it handle dependencies, it compiles everything onto your local machine, meaning it's optimized for your particular hardware. This gives you a performance boost (though minimal in my experience).

    The obvious downside is that you need to have a decent internet connection to download all the source code (this is the same with Apt and yum) but also with Portage you have to be able to leave your computer alone for hours and sometimes days at a time while something compiles (times depend greatly on your CPU/RAM/harddrive speeds). The thing that keeps me from using Gentoo on my main system is the downtime. I don't want to have my computer basically unusable as I compile Xorg. If you don't mind this, however, Gentoo is great.
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  4. #14
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    What about RPM from RedHat and mandrake.. When it comes to the installation and uninstallation of new software i find the Mandrake software media center system very efficient and also easy to use.

    Daniel

  5. #15
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libervisco
    What about RPM from RedHat and mandrake.. When it comes to the installation and uninstallation of new software i find the Mandrake software media center system very efficient and also easy to use.

    Daniel
    The big problem (for me) with RPM-based systems when they're not using Apt4Rpm, is that they don't handle dependencies. Basically what this means is to install any given program you need XXXX.rpm, YYY.rpm and ZZZ.rpm, and when you find those, you realize that XXXX.rpm needs AAA.rpm and BBB.rpm, and so on and so on. This is commonly known as "RPM Hell".

    That being said, there are versions of Apt for Redhat and Mandrake, as well as Yum, that do handle dependencies. By themselves however, they're not fun. This is why I stick with Debian. Apt is the default package system, and it works just fine.

    On the subject of Mandrake, perhaps it's just the versions I tried, but I've had very bad luck with their software installation/uninstallation tools. Half the time they freeze or crash randomly, and they *never* seem to want to connect to the Mandrake servers to update properly. Not to mention the discs don't always boot for installation. Your mileage may vary. I tend to shy away from that distro myself, even though it was the first Linux I ever tried.
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  6. #16
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    I think distributions are all generally easy to use, once you do a little reading. Of all the articles and opinions I've seen on the subject, Ubuntu seems to be very recommended for beginners. Being Dell's pick says something about it, also, I believe.

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