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@Beojan: OK, I am going to stick with debian. Any idea what is the iso I must download will be welcome @Dapper Dan: I already tried all distros/WMs via live ...
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  1. #11
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    @Beojan:
    OK, I am going to stick with debian. Any idea what is the iso I must download will be welcome

    @Dapper Dan:
    I already tried all distros/WMs via live cd or install or virtual machine. I think its time to settle down.
    Exessive dating and nobody stable in your life is dangerous you know

    @ozar:
    which is the leanest, meanest and fastest ?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalheadGautham View Post
    @ozar:
    which is the leanest, meanest and fastest ?
    That would probably be Crux, but it's also probably the most difficult to install for most new users. None of the three are really oriented toward new users, but anyone can install and use any of them if they have the time and determination to work through all issues.
    oz

  3. #13
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    As I said in the PM, I suggest you download the kde iso. (Look on the downloads page, it's there somewhere)

  4. #14
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    OK guys, I am installing debian soon. But the problem is that I have free download in my internet plan only between 2:00 AM and 8:00 AM. So I need to wait a while to get the download started(I am ~9.5 hours ahead of US time; GMT + 5.5).

    I hope a 1GB partition is enough for Crux+custom kernel excluding swap, as thats all I can devote for a second distro.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalheadGautham View Post
    I hope a 1GB partition is enough for Crux+custom kernel excluding swap, as thats all I can devote for a second distro.
    From the CRUX handbook:
    The amount of disk space you need depends on how many packages you choose to install. I recommend having at least a 1G root partition (CRUX will use about 200MB-500MB depending on your configuration).

    Using ReiserFS is recommended, but there is support for Ext2fs/Ext3fs, XFS and JFS as well. Further, I highly recommend separating system data from user data, i.e. use a separate partition for /home (and possibly /var) since that will make your life a lot easier the day you want to upgrade/reinstall/remove your system.
    If one gig is all you have, that might make for an interesting project, seeing just how minimal you can go and still have what you consider a viable OS. When you are ready to go, this might also provide some assistance.
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered:#371367 New Members: click here

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper Dan View Post
    From the CRUX handbook:


    If one gig is all you have, that might make for an interesting project, seeing just how minimal you can go and still have what you consider a viable OS. When you are ready to go, this might also provide some assistance.
    w00t! Me messing with just the bare minimum ? I am really happy now
    But I doubt I will ever get enough time to mess with crux before a month
    A man learns from his experience. A smart man learns from the experience of others, while a smarter man experiences life after knowing other's experiences.

    BE THE SMARTER MAN.

  7. #17
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    One final question(hopefully)

    Is Debian Sid really stable enough for me to install ? Or should I stick with Lenny ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Debian
    Please note that security updates for "unstable" distribution are not managed by the security team. Hence, "unstable" does not get security updates in a timely manner. For more information please see the Security Team's FAQ.
    "sid" is subject to massive changes and in-place library updates. This can result in a very "unstable" system which contains packages that cannot be installed due to missing libraries, dependencies that cannot be fulfilled etc. Use it at your own risk!
    That sounds threatening to me.
    A man learns from his experience. A smart man learns from the experience of others, while a smarter man experiences life after knowing other's experiences.

    BE THE SMARTER MAN.

  8. #18
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    I read a statistic somewhere that 70% of Debian desktop systems are running Sid. It's about as unstable as a release of Ubuntu. In fact it is more stable than Ubuntu, because for some reason Ubuntu includes packages from Experimental (You really shouldn't mix Debian versions). Also, Sid does get security updates, but they go straight into the main repository, and it actually gets security updates before Lenny.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by beojan View Post
    I read a statistic somewhere that 70% of Debian desktop systems are running Sid. It's about as unstable as a release of Ubuntu. In fact it is more stable than Ubuntu, because for some reason Ubuntu includes packages from Experimental (You really shouldn't mix Debian versions). Also, Sid does get security updates, but they go straight into the main repository, and it actually gets security updates before Lenny.
    but what about that quote ?
    and why not just pin sid to lenny repos with minimum priority ?
    A man learns from his experience. A smart man learns from the experience of others, while a smarter man experiences life after knowing other's experiences.

    BE THE SMARTER MAN.

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    The warning was aimed at people who intended to use Sid to run a server. For these people, it is best to use Stable + backports, but for a desktop user, Sid is pefectly stable. Software is only put into Sid if it is considered stable for home desktops. Debian Stable is aimed at the server market, and Testing (Lenny) is just a way of gradually creating the next release. Also, if you pin sid to lenny with minimum priority, you won't get any Sid packages. I myself have been using Sid for more than 6 months and I have had very few problems, except where i broke it my running `rm -rf /*` and deleting my entire /bin and /boot directory. Even then, i managed to fix it and it is working great now.

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