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I love speedy interaction with my operating system. I'm a vi and mutt user and I don't mind getting getting dirty in config files. My biggest gripe, though, is that ...
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  1. #1
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    X is not Windows, and that's the problem


    I love speedy interaction with my operating system. I'm a vi and mutt user and I don't mind getting getting dirty in config files. My biggest gripe, though, is that Linux can't hold a candle to Windows 7 in terms of window management.

    I have dual monitors, one 1920x1080 and one 1080x1920. Windows recognizes that I need an L-shaped desktop. X insists on giving me a 1920x1920 desktop that my mouse disappears in regularly. I'm sure I could fix this with a script or something that binds my mouse inside my monitor dimensions, but I'm sure this would break something else.

    My second issue is more fundamental. I can't live without the Win+ArrowKeys windows management features. Win+Up maximizes, Win+Down minimizes, Win+Left and Win+Right can tile two documents vertically on my screen. It's all very intuitive and makes multitasking a lot faster, which as I said before, is a most important feature for me.

    So, is there a Windows Manager out there that can be easily configured to fix these two issues?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    The screen resolution issue isn't a window manager issue, just X. You can probably fix it by adding a custom xorg.conf. The Arch Wiki has a lot of good info on that. Outside of installing xorg, all the info should be distro agnostic.

    The Win+Arrow key thing is a function of the window manager. Personally, I'm a fan of openbox or pekwm. Adding that functionality should be relatively straightforward in each.

    For example, in openbox, for the Win+Up to maximize, you would have in the config file, rc.xml,
    Code:
    <keybind key="W-Up">
          <action name="ToggleMaximizeFull"/>
    </keybind>
    EDIT: Tiling might be a little more tricky. It's not something I use, so I'm not sure how to go about it, but you can create pseudo-tiling in openbox. Otherwise, a tiliing window manager may be what you want.

  3. #3
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    with all of the involvement of the NSA and the mysteriously missing, patented, key-stroke monitor, I have zero desire to play with Win7! I run Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and with the use of Compiz and the rotating Cube Desktop, I have the ability to drag and drop from one desk top to another and being a multi-tasker, I often use 10 of the twenty possible desktops to great effect. The adjustment, from windows to Linux, was very easy and the learning curve has been almost flat with few, though very effective, adjustments.

    It sounds to me like you're resisting the small change you need to make.
    Last edited by th1bill; 03-06-2011 at 01:48 AM.

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    You basically need compiz for top notch window management.

    As of multiple monitors setups, most DEs provide a GUI to fix that... for e.g. in KDE multiple monitors work perfectly.

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    Ubuntu uses Gnome Desktop, but they have swapped out their default classic window manager "metacity" with the flashy new compositing window manager "Compiz". The result is a very beautiful interface that rivals not just Window 7, but even Mac OS X (in my opinion). On top of that, you can install the "emerald" theme manager to modify, or create your own, window decorations.

    Compiz also manages key bindings, so it can solve your windows key problem.

    When you first launch the Compiz Settings Manager "ccsm", you will see just how many different window effects, for example that fade-away effect you see when you close a window in Windows Vista. There are miscelaneous tools that let you, for example, draw a red line on the screen, which is helpful during presentations. There are key-bindings to do anything, from arranging windows on screen automatically, to switching desktops like the "Spaces" and "Expose" features available in Mac OS X.
    Last edited by ramin.honary; 03-06-2011 at 05:01 AM. Reason: lots of little mistakes corrected

  7. #6
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    We have the best WM only available for Unix like system.. the Windows WM is one of the worst around... the usual Bill Gates crap.


    Your multi head issue is X related, i.e Xinerama extension/protocol or both.

  8. #7
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Search and You Will Find

    Quote Originally Posted by anaphora View Post
    I love speedy interaction with my operating system. I'm a vi and mutt user and I don't mind getting getting dirty in config files. My biggest gripe, though, is that Linux can't hold a candle to Windows 7 in terms of window management.

    I have dual monitors, one 1920x1080 and one 1080x1920. Windows recognizes that I need an L-shaped desktop. X insists on giving me a 1920x1920 desktop that my mouse disappears in regularly. I'm sure I could fix this with a script or something that binds my mouse inside my monitor dimensions, but I'm sure this would break something else.

    My second issue is more fundamental. I can't live without the Win+ArrowKeys windows management features. Win+Up maximizes, Win+Down minimizes, Win+Left and Win+Right can tile two documents vertically on my screen. It's all very intuitive and makes multitasking a lot faster, which as I said before, is a most important feature for me.

    So, is there a Windows Manager out there that can be easily configured to fix these two issues?

    Backup all valuable files from your user directories that you cannot live without.

    Open form the desktop menu ... Add/Remove Software and in the search box write: WM
    There are Window Manager packages (that are not MS Windows), and that you can experiment with.
    If we follow the logic of De_Logics, you may uninstall your current desktop, and after that install kde-desktop or gnome-desktop (Add/Remove Software: gnome-desktop).
    If the file system does not attach to the desktop, install Nautilus (if it is already installed - reinstall it). The adjustments are in System -> Preferences -> Desktop Effects.
    System -> Preferences -> Display -> Detect Monitors will recognize all the monitors attached to the system (or their first driver approximation), but I can't say whether it will support dual monitors or not. It should be tested.
    If gnome-desktop does not support your dual monitor try with kde-desktop (you may try only the monitors), but if you install the whole kde-desktop you should find out which is the File Manager for kde (it is not Nautilus).

    In my view Gnome Desktop looks much more professional.
    From the KDE desktop I have on the Gnome Desktop only the K-Thesaurus which works 'without comments'. So you can experiment.

  9. #8
    Just Joined! VirtualLinuxUser's Avatar
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    Angry The Problem with Windows is that it's not X

    I don't know about tiling windows on a desktop. I find switching between multiple windows on the same desktop is a bit of a mission, even with keyboard shortcuts.

    What you can do is have multiple virtual desktops, each with one or more apps running. To switch between them, press either <Ctrl> + <Alt> + <Left> or <Ctrl> + <Alt> + <Right>. To switch between windows on the same desktop, hover your cursor over the bars in the relevant panel and rotate your mouse wheel. If this fails, you can always use <Alt> + <Tab> + <Tab> (Hold down <Alt> and press <Tab> to show all open windows on the current desktop. Still holding down <Alt>, press <Tab> the requisite number of times to switch to another window.)

    EDIT : The file manager for KDE is Konqueror (which can also be used as a simple web browser).
    Last edited by VirtualLinuxUser; 03-06-2011 at 11:01 AM. Reason: Added KDE File Manager information

  10. #9
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anaphora View Post
    I love speedy interaction with my operating system. I'm a vi and mutt user and I don't mind getting getting dirty in config files. My biggest gripe, though, is that Linux can't hold a candle to Windows 7 in terms of window management.

    I have dual monitors, one 1920x1080 and one 1080x1920. Windows recognizes that I need an L-shaped desktop. X insists on giving me a 1920x1920 desktop that my mouse disappears in regularly. I'm sure I could fix this with a script or something that binds my mouse inside my monitor dimensions, but I'm sure this would break something else.

    My second issue is more fundamental. I can't live without the Win+ArrowKeys windows management features. Win+Up maximizes, Win+Down minimizes, Win+Left and Win+Right can tile two documents vertically on my screen. It's all very intuitive and makes multitasking a lot faster, which as I said before, is a most important feature for me.

    So, is there a Windows Manager out there that can be easily configured to fix these two issues?
    I don't see where is the problem.
    The X window for Gnome has 'originally set' keyboard shortcuts (including for window management), and has even options to customize the system with set by the customer commands, and also four workspaces that can be organized in a cube... and where is the problem.
    Maybe some people should test their mouse first (to see whether they don't use optical mouse on photo-pad, for example).

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