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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    Most Prevalent X Windows System toolkit


    What is the most prevalent X Windows System Toolkit for Linux?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Good question. GTK+ and Qt are both widely used. There is also wx. What are you trying to do? For my $$, for user application development, Qt would probably get the nod.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Thanks for the reply!

    I'm currently trying to get to the basics of Linux. I have read a million guides /tutorials and have dicided I will have to track stuff down myself. I'm even planning to debug a good application to see what the hell goes on.

    One of my goals is to find out how applications are launched after boot. Ive heard that BASH lauches everything and also that there are other ways also. If you use a process monitor and have BASH launch an application the new process is a child of BASH but when you click a menu it does not invoke BASH. I looks like a GUI toolkit System call is most likely what is forking init but no one really knows. I find it stange that the answer to this is so evasive. If you use qpt is gives the command that launched it and has the new process a child of init but everything else is a mystery.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    There are a number of ways to start an application. As you noticed, bash (and other shells) do a fork/exec. You can also use exec...() functions such as execl(), execlp(), execle(), execv(), execvp(), etc. These spawn processes without forking (at least explicitly). In any case, these are all well understood, and not difficult to get a handle on. So, what are you REALLY trying to do?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    Wink I want to learn Linux like I have learned everything else.

    From a lot of the understandings out there I would not be surprised if developers where just trying to cover up the fact that there is a mouse running around on a wheel inside the computer case. There are soo many misconceptions that are taken as a premise. If I read 90 percent of the guides and tutorials left I would gain a 5 percent understanding on the curve as it is. There is too much abstraction to explain things that really exits as data in memory. Abstraction is meant as a cheap way out that has consequences in the long run and not as a staple of understanding. I might be crazy but I don't think it should take over five years part time to be able to become a developer/ administrator. I got fed up the first time around learning about computers and turned to Microcontrollers and learned a lot. I learned some assembly language and so on. Now I'm going to use the same approach with Linux because the non hands on approach is not making sense. I can't read testimonials from snake oil salsepeople over and over. My point is that code like X windows system library make the majority just look at the library as the answer to any question and this does not explain how anything works. Too much of the process of how computing is accomplished is left out. If I am a supervisor , demanding my employees to accomplish a task does not explain how it will get done. So I guess I'm trying to build a model of how Linux works that encapsulates more than just commands and association.

    For the sixty 4 thousand dollar question ; would you know what process or whatever actually runs the fork code. Who's CPU time is running the fork code?

    By the way thanks for the help!
    Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 04-06-2011 at 04:06 AM.

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