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I'd like to hear your opinions about those window managers. What are the advantages of each of them? Additionally, which one has a better support for dual head monitors. thanking ...
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  1. #1
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    i3 vs awesome


    I'd like to hear your opinions about those window managers. What are the advantages of each of them?

    Additionally, which one has a better support for dual head monitors.


    thanking you

    portia

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    I've not used either of them, but I found this comparison on the Arch Wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...indow_Managers
    Jay

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  3. #3
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    I am a huge fan of tiling window managers. After all these years, Windows and Mac are finally changing their user interfaces to make use of tiling. But we Linux users know, we were the first to actually use tiling.

    I use XMonad because I like the Haskell programming language, and I can write my own plugins easily if I want. It is also configured using the Haskell language, which is rare.

    I have also used Awesome, and it's name suits it well. Configuration is done in Lua, which is a nice, simple scripting language. I recommend Awesome to anyone who is interested in tiling window managers, but not interested in Haskell. I think you can use Awesome to replace the default window manager in Gnome (metacity). This allows you to use the panel, and the Gnome look-and-feel themes, and the Gnome Control Center, and everything that is nice about Gnome, but still have your favorite tiling windows.

    I also use Gnome GlobalMenu to make all menu bars appear in the panel, like in MacOS. This saves screen realestate.

    I have not used i3, but I don't think it is as well-established as Awesome. The website seems to suggest that i3 is targeted more towards hackers who like to configure their own code. From the site:
    Write well readable, well documented code. Create additional documentation on how to extend i3 by explaining its internal workings.
    This includes being modifyable by people who do know how to program but who are not necessarily familiar with all of X11’s internals. That is, document why things happen and when they happen so that the user gets a picture of the whole process a Window Manager is responsible of by just reading the source code.
    Last edited by ramin.honary; 06-22-2011 at 07:15 AM.

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  5. #4
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    I have tried stacking window managers but not tiling window managers. But Arch users are seems to be fans of tiling managers. Archlinux forums and wiki contains lot of information regarding i3 and awesome.


  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by sreek View Post
    I have tried stacking window managers but not tiling window managers. But Arch users are seems to be fans of tiling managers. Archlinux forums and wiki contains lot of information regarding i3 and awesome.
    I think everyone has used stacking window managers, because the original Xerox PARC GUI, and the MacOS which copied them, and the Windows which copied MacOS, all used it first.

    But why would anyone want to have their work in a window that they have to shift around and resize using a mouse? I just want my work to be in front of me, taking up the whole screen immediately, and when I want to switch to something else, I want that work to taking up the whole screen immediately. I don't want to have to always use the mouse and click the tiny little maximize button which is right next to the close button.

    If I need two windows to be side-by-side, I want them to be side-by-frickn-side immediately, I don't want to spend 15 seconds to un-maximize, resize, and move two windows, and I don't want to use the mouse to click back and forth to switch focus between windows.

    Tiling makes everything easier and faster. It amazes me just how stubborn computer users are when it comes to avoiding learning new interfaces, otherwise the industry probably would have made the switch a long time ago.

  7. #6
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    Thank You for the information ramin . I was not knowing the history of stacking window managers. Actually i am using fluxbox with slackware. Now i want to try jwm window manager. And for this reason i want to shift to Arch distro, because their wiki, forums and suppoert on window managers is very good.

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