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alright i've been wanting to switch from windows to linux for a long time now and have been going on and off for about a year now. I have a ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    could use some help


    alright i've been wanting to switch from windows to linux for a long time now and have been going on and off for about a year now. I have a dual boot now with winxp/mandrake 10. If you can help me out by providing some links or answers to these questions it would be great.

    -dual monitor config with fx5900xt (tryed before didn't work, couldn't find screens after i configured file)
    -customization of kde (system monitors and stuff I see on screenshots)
    -installing programs or packages (after rpm were does it go)
    -supported games in linux (like ut)
    -why only some commands work in the terminal/shell/console (not sure what to call it) as root
    -x windows (kde???) fails to load on bootup. Guessing its the nvidia drivers. once i do modprobe nvidia i think it will work.
    modprobe -l nvidia
    /lib/modules/2.6.3-7mdk/kernel/drivers/video/nvidia.ko
    does that mean its loaded?



    thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    1. RPMs install files to locations based on what they are (binaries in /usr/bin, libraries in /usr/lib, etc.) If you only intend to run the program, you don't need to know where- you can run it from anywhere just by typing it's name, including when you hit "Run Application..."

    2. When you installed the nVidia driver, did you make sure to edit your X config file as mentioned in the README file for the driver? There's a lot of other important info in that readme, make sure to read it.

    3. I don't use KDE (hated the interface), so I can't help you. I use Gnome for simplicity of use and because it seems slightly less bloated than KDE.

    4. Some things only run as root for security reasons. The "root" user is the master admin account for the system, compared to windows where the default user is admin (very very bad for security).

    5. KDE is not X windows, it runs on top of X windows. X is the Linux GUI mainframe. It doesn't do things like controlling window size, position, borders, taskbars, desktops. Controlling windows on the screen is the job of the window manager (WM), and the desktop is handled by a desktop environment (DE). KDE is a full desktop environment, and I believe it has it's own window manager. Gnome is another full desktop environment, and it uses either Sawfish or Metacity as it's window manager. Some window managers are very usuable without a desktop environment, such as Enlightenment, Fluxbox, and XFCE. It's really just your personal preference.
    Emotions are the key to the soul.
    Registered Linux User #375050

  3. #3
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    thanks for your help, kde just appeared to be the best choice at install because its default with mandrake, i have yet to play with gnome and other distros. I'm trying to learn linux alittle more before I do that. also in windows there was a program msconfig which controlled startup programs and services, anything like this in linux? and my nvidia drivers worked fine for a while then i installed the nforce drivers and that completely killed my whole setup, wasn't able to fix it so i reinstalled and just setup the drivers for nvidia and installed the nforce drivers but never configured it. Could it be because of the nforce drivers messing with the nvidia ones?

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  5. #4
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    I know you can select services by editing the right config file (I don't know which one, I'm still learning about Linux), and there's probably a GUI frontend for editing it too, but I don't know what it might be on Mandrake.
    As for changing the bootloader options, that depends on whether you use LILO or GRUB. Most systems use GRUB, and the config file for it is located at /boot/grub/grub.conf
    I've learned from a simlar experience to not install the nForce drivers unless you actually have an nForce motherboard chipset . If you just have an nVidia video card, you should only install the nVidia driver, the nForce drivers are for built-in sound/networking on motherboards with the nForce chipset, and it breaks the configuration if that's not what you have.

    To be honest, I haven't looked at start-up programs/services much (yet) beyond just mounting devices in /etc/fstab since I haven't needed to.
    Emotions are the key to the soul.
    Registered Linux User #375050

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