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Hi, I've been using Fedora 16 (with KDE 4) for about 1. The only problem I had so far is that even though I unchecked "Screen Energy Saving" and "Dim ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Feb 2012
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    Screensaver shows even if it is disabled


    Hi,

    I've been using Fedora 16 (with KDE 4) for about 1. The only problem I had so far is that even though I unchecked "Screen Energy Saving" and "Dim Display" options (Power Management Settings), after about 10-15 minutes of inactivity, my screen become black.How can i fix this ?


    Thx

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    does this happen when you are in a virtual terminal (white text on black screen), or at the (KDE) desktop? have you tried running updates, in case it is a bug that has since gotten fixed?

    Code:
    yum update
    are you using xscreensaver, or some KDE-specific screensaver utility?

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
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    Feb 2012
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    Thanks for the response.
    I actually don't know what i'm using....i kept it as it was by default. While browsing another forum, i found this command:
    Code:
    xset -dpms s noblank
    It works, however, the effects are not permanent. I made a script that runs automatically after boot...but If anyone knows a better way to make the effects of this command permanent, please let me know.

  4. #4
    Trusted Penguin
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    May 2011
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    if your system uses ~/.xsession, you can put the xset command in there. a simple ~/.xession example file might look like:
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    xset -dpms s noblank
    exec gnome-session
    you can create it if it does not exist. the file must be executable. the way is is supposed to work (and used to in the old days) is, after you login via the graphical display manager (gdm/kdm/xdm, etc.), the ~/.xsession file is read, if present, and the custom session is started according to that file. otherwise, a system generic session is started.

    similarly, if in runlevel 3 / no-graphic mode, and you start your graphical session by running "startx", then the file ~/.xinitrc is read, which otherwise is the same as ~/.xsession.

    if you system does not honor this file, browse the /etc/X11 directory. the X start-up scripts are (usually) found there, and i'm sure you can find what you want by looking around.

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