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I'm interested in the exact process of when an application (browser) makes the mouse freeze or crashes the desktop environment. Thanks in advance!...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    What specifically causes a mouse/desktop to freeze?


    I'm interested in the exact process of when an application (browser) makes the mouse freeze or crashes the desktop environment.

    Thanks in advance!
    Presently into Rpm based Distros as in ,Mageia ,Fedora CentOS and Scientific.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    What browser are you using? FWIW, although a browser MAY cause the system to freeze momentarily because of excessive CPU usage (Chrome does this occasionally for me), it should NEVER crash the desktop environment. So, what browser, desktop, operating system / version, kernel are you using?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie theKbStockpiler's Avatar
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    This has happened on all of my distros (12?),XP with all of my browsers so I'm thinking this issue is here to stay. I use Mageia 1 the most. I'm interested in knowing how the application that the mouse is interacting with locks out X sort of speak? I'm also interested in any help of how to use xsession error log with any intelligence. Is there a way to tell what messages are created by a certain application? Will the developers of X give me a chart of what the errors mean?
    Presently into Rpm based Distros as in ,Mageia ,Fedora CentOS and Scientific.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If you look in /var/log/messages or run the dmesg command, you might get some idea of what's going on. There are also application level messages that go into files in /var/log, either in a file or sub-directory.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Also starting the browser from the command line may give some interactive messages
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  6. #6
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Main suspect on the scene of the crash is the desktop graphics of the newly developed OSs.
    With every day and in any way the desktop graphics becomes more and more complex ... at the expense of functionality and reliability. Besides better functionality and reliability the older OSs provided better degrees of freedom (to the user) and freedom of expression. The newer OSs are wasting the computational power of the newer machines mainly for managing the desktop graphics (with all the digitally remastered flash sliding windows and space effects).
    Time is not far when all the computational power of the Universe will not be enouth to support the newly developed desktop graphics.
    Rubberman likes this.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    To user-f11: so true! I specifically do not use the latest in the desktop GUI's for just your reasoning. People seem to keep forgetting the KISS principal in favor of fancy graphical effects that are basically useless for what you really need when running a system. I'm still running gnome 2.x or kde 4.x (preferably 3.x).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
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    theKbStockpiler said:
    This has happened on all of my distros (12?),XP with all of my browsers so I'm thinking this issue is here to stay.
    If your mouse is problematical over all the distros that you have installed on the same computer, then the problem which suggests itself is hardware. I have had this lock-up problem and it's very annoying. The way I resolved it was to change the mouse or to change the mouse type from PS/2 to a usb mouse, and to change to a mouse that is known to work on another system.

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Just a second. Is your mouse wireless. If this is the case test whether the system works with wired mouse.
    If it works with wired mouse see the chip of the wireless adapter (from the cardboard of the mouse) and install the Wi-Fi driver for it. For the purpose in the search box of the Package Installer write: wifi mouse
    If you don't have proper wifi driver for your wifi mouse adapter, go to the OEM page and download the wifi drivers for linux. There must be a readme file or install file in the source package.
    Compile the drivers on your computer and patch the kernel. Restart the computer.
    If everything is O.K. the wireless mouse should be working.

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