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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Why do I see so much variation in the time it takes to start X ?


    I use the startx command on one of my distros and I have noticed that when I boot the system from cold, there is a long wait before the X-server start-up messages begin to scroll up the screen. With a warm boot, on the other hand, X starts up almost immediately.

    Can anyone explain this? Just curious.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  2. #2
    Bearings. grease. temperature? You know. The reaL WORLD ENVIRONMENT LIKE LEFT OVER POWER ON A WARM UNIT VS A DRAINED COLD UNIT. (DURN CAP LOCK GOT STUCK. i AM NOT YELLING). My old gear gives me fits also.

    If not.

    MAYBE dmesg or /var can explain.
    I refuse to let fear and fear of others rule my life. It puts my humanity at risk.
    Accepting Death is the only way to stay alive.

  3. #3
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    Aside: Wher're you comin from today, rok? Sounds like you're HO'd and got grease on your hands from last night's work that turned into a party!
    On topic: I have no idea!
    LOL

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  5. #4
    Shucks, I'm busted again.

    Anyhows. I figure it is a hardware/real world thing than a software/airy-fairy type of thing.
    I refuse to let fear and fear of others rule my life. It puts my humanity at risk.
    Accepting Death is the only way to stay alive.

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Would have to dig into difference between a warm boot and cold boot probably less initialization/setup going on in background.

  7. #6
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    I think that when you boot the hardware has to be brought up, tested and prepared for use whereas as with a reboot that part is skipped.

    As an aside: it's been a long time since I've experienced a system where memory needs to be completely reset to fix a problem but back in the dark ages I recall having to allow the power to drain out of chips before restarting after a kernel panic.

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregm View Post

    As an aside: it's been a long time since I've experienced a system where memory needs to be completely reset to fix a problem but back in the dark ages I recall having to allow the power to drain out of chips before restarting after a kernel panic.
    Yes, remembering having to power off count to ten then restart. LOL

  9. #8
    Here's one explanation... Cold Boot v Warm Boot

    "Having had the power off, your computer has cleaned out data that has been placed in different caches or memory holding areas."

  10. #9
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    What I find so curious is that starting X is not really part of the boot process. Once the console login prompt comes up, booting should be over. X is just a program that you are starting. So why at that stage should there be a difference between a warm and a cold boot?

    What I observe in the case of a cold boot is that after sending startx, the console freezes completely for about 10 seconds. Then the first X message comes up, which is about the xauth file. From that point onward, everything happens more or less instantly. Does anyone know what X is actually doing during those 10 seconds?
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by hazel
    What I find so curious is that starting X is not really part of the boot process.
    I agree. I use a console login and by the time the prompt shows up, the system is obviously up and running... don't understand the connection, assuming there is one.

    Quote Originally Posted by hazel
    What I observe in the case of a cold boot is that after sending startx, the console freezes completely for about 10 seconds. Then the first X message comes up, which is about the xauth file. From that point onward, everything happens more or less instantly.
    I think xauth verifies, via pam, that the user is authorized to run an X session. Any idea whether it's the authorization or X that's taking 10 seconds? Is the desktop a just a window manager, or a DE which starts a number of services, one or more of which might cause the delay? Anything in the /var logs or ~/.xsession-errors?

    Probably won't make a difference but have you tried using xinit instead of startx? You also might limit the executable .xinitrc in the home dir. to starting just a small window manager (Icewm, JWM, Fluxbox, etc) to see if the delay is the same or different.

    Quote Originally Posted by hazel
    Does anyone know what X is actually doing during those 10 seconds?
    This man page has a pretty good overview.

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