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I want to know these three topics 1 Rights 2 Permission 3 Policy 1 how i give rights to user 2 how i give permission to user 3 how i ...
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  1. #1
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    how to give rights and permission to user in linux


    I want to know these three topics

    1 Rights
    2 Permission
    3 Policy

    1 how i give rights to user
    2 how i give permission to user
    3 how i give policy to user

    i have linux redhat in server side but my client side those have windows 98,windows me ,xp ,windows profissional 2000

    please give instraction step by step

  2. #2
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    I have the same question.

    SO just following this thread.

  3. #3
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    UNIX/Linux has no per-user permissions/rights/policies. Everything is done on files, making sure who can read/write/exectute the right files.
    To check the current permissions of files, run "ls -l". If you run "ls -l /", to list all files in the root directory, you will get output that looks something like this:
    Code:
    drwxr-xr-x    2 root     root         4096 2003-07-15 22:41 bin
    drwxr-xr-x    4 root     root         1024 2003-07-16 03:26 boot
    drwxr-xr-x   20 root     root       118784 2003-07-16 03:32 dev
    ...
    The first column (that looks like drwxr-xr-x) is the mode of the file. The first character indicates what kind of file it is. d, as in this case, means directory. - means regular file, and then there are some other file types of which you need not know more now, like named FIFOs, sockets, devices, etc. The rwxr-xr-x is the permissions of file. The first rwx means that the owner of the file can read, write and execute the file. For directories, the right to execute it means the right to use it. Just being able to read a directory means that you can read what files are in the directory, but you won't be able to use them without the execute permission on the directory. The first r-x means that those that are in the same group as the file have read and execute permissions to the file. The second r-x means that all those that are neither the owner of the file nor are in the same group as the file have read and execute permissions on it. So r=read, w=write and x=execute, and the first group of three applies to the owner of the file, the second group applies to those in the same group of the file, and the third group applies to all other users.
    The second column (2, 4 and 20 in this case) is the number of links that the file has. Don't care about that for now.
    The third column is the owner of the file, in this case root.
    The fourth column is the group of the file, in this case the root group.
    The fifth column is the size of the file.
    The sixth is the time the file was last modified
    The seventh is naturally the name of the file.

    I hope that makes it a bit clearer, but feel free to ask away.

  4. #4
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    Just like dolda said and there are three command that you need to learn.

    chmod /*change the ppermissions of a file*/
    chown /*change the owner of the file*/
    chgrp /*change the group that the file belongs to*/

    example:
    chmod 777 somefile.file /*this gives exe write and read to all */ not recommended for any file.

    for chmod here is a list of the numbers and what they meen

    the 100's are for the owner of the file
    400 reed
    200 write
    100 execute

    10's are for the group of the file
    40 read
    20 write
    10 execute

    1's are for everyone else
    4 read
    2 write
    1 execute

    you add the number together to get different permmisions

    hope this helps
    The computer made me do it!! Slackware and SUSE too Gig\'em WHOOOOP!!
    \"God put me on this earth to accomplish a certain amount of tasks, At the rate I\'m going I will never die.\" (I don\'t know)

  5. #5
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    Chmod and chown are the commands you need to know about. Check out the manpages on thoose commands to learn the fundamentals on unix permissions.
    Regards

    Andutt

  6. #6
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    Is there a way to change permissions on many files at a time...??? like in windows xp???

    THanks

  7. #7
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    Indeed. Do you want to change perms on all files in a directory tree? In that case, use chmod -R. See the manpage for more options.

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer
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    U can use wilcards also like..

    Code:
    chmod 755 *.txt
    for example..
    Regards

    Andutt

  9. #9
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    COOL!!! THAnk You!!!

  10. #10
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    well but how to make roo permission to user in trustrix

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