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Ok, so when I first boot up KDE, it came up in 640x480 resolution. I didn't like that, because everything was too big, so I went to the KDE control ...
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  1. #1
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    Only 640x480 in KDE


    Ok, so when I first boot up KDE, it came up in 640x480 resolution. I didn't like that, because everything was too big, so I went to the KDE control center to try to change the display size. I got there and saw the default 640x480 on a combobox, so I clicked it and discovered that there were no other choices! This really is unacceptable, as my monitor was set to 1024x768 when I had windows, and I would really like it to be set to 1024x768 now. What can I do to get it set to 1024x768?

  2. #2
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    what distro are you using?

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    Slackware 10.1, with KDE 3.4

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  5. #4
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    Edit (as root) your xorg.conf file located in /etc/X11 and use your text editor to modify the "screen sections" and for me once I installed nvidia drivers I had to also change the monitro's section for "horizsync" and "vertrefresh". I changed those by placing the # in front of them so as not to worry about them anymore. Back to the screen sections, if that part didnt work, check your DefaultDepth and then go to the subsection display and you see the modes. Change the mode that has your default color depth and put your desired resolution in front of the one listed. This makes it default. So in the end mine looks like this:

    # DefaultDepth 8
    # DefaultDepth 16
    DefaultDepth 24
    # DefaultDepth 32

    # "1024x768" is also a conservative usable default resolution. If you
    # have a better monitor, feel free to try resolutions such as
    # "1152x864", "1280x1024", "1600x1200", and "1800x1400" (or whatever your
    # card/monitor can produce)

    Subsection "Display"
    Depth 8
    Modes "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubsection
    Subsection "Display"
    Depth 16
    Modes "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubsection
    Subsection "Display"# DefaultDepth 8
    # DefaultDepth 16
    DefaultDepth 24
    # DefaultDepth 32

    # "1024x768" is also a conservative usable default resolution. If you
    # have a better monitor, feel free to try resolutions such as
    # "1152x864", "1280x1024", "1600x1200", and "1800x1400" (or whatever your
    # card/monitor can produce)

    Subsection "Display"
    Depth 8
    Modes "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubsection
    Subsection "Display"
    Depth 16
    Modes "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    EndSubsection
    Subsection "Display"
    Depth 24
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
    Depth 24
    Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"

    Sorry for making it sound so complicated, it really isnt! I hope this will work for you.

  6. #5
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    You may still have to edit your horizontal and vertical refresh rates (if they're not correct) to get higher resolutions working.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    Hi, thanks all for your replies.
    I had tried editing xorg.conf before, but it doesn't seem to make much difference
    I think the problem is probably the horizontal and vertical refresh rates, but I don't know what they should be.
    Is there any way I can find out what I should set them as?

  8. #7
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    Go to your monitor maunfacturer's website or another location of the specifications for it. For me, I just used # as to not use the horizontal and vertical specifics.

  9. #8
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    You can usually (but not always) find the horizontal and vertical refresh rates on the back of your monitor.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  10. #9
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    Yay I got it to display 1024x768! It took some messing around with the current xorg.conf file, xorgconfig, and trying other xorg.conf files to finally get it. Thanks for all your help
    Ah it looks so much better now...

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