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I'm currently using Debian linux with KDE 2.2. x. I currently have the Windows .ttf fonts installed and would like to replace them with the vera stream fonts (the one ...
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  1. #1
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    fonts


    I'm currently using Debian linux with KDE 2.2. x. I currently have the Windows .ttf fonts installed and would like to replace them with the vera stream fonts (the one that RedHat uses). Can someone please help me on how I can do this? Does it matter if I run xfs or not?
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  2. #2
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    I haven't done anything with my fonts, so I'm certainly not sure about this, but I have checked on this before, and as far as I know, all you need to do is copy the font files into the correct directory. Check your X config to see where the font directories are. If you use XFS, the font paths can be found in /etc/X11/fs/config, and if you don't, they can be found in /etc/X11/XF86Config in the "Files" section. Mine are in /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts, and I suspect that most distros use that. I don't think (<- certainly not authoritative) that it really matters what subdirectory you put it in, but I guess it would be a good thing to at least match the filename extensions (eg. if you have .afm or .pfb font files, put them in the Type1 subdir). Then, remake the font database with mkfontdir.
    Then you can use the fonts without logging out and back in again (and restarting XFS if you use that) by running "xset fp rehash", to make the X server rehash font information at runtime.

    Note that I'm not sure about this, though. I'm pretty sure that there's a HOWTO on tldp that can be more authoritative if this fails.

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    Is it crucial to have xfonts100dpi? Currently, I'm using xfonts75dpi because I think it looks nicer. When I was installing GIMP, it stated that both should be installed.
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  4. #4
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    Actually, after running "xset fp rehash", now the KDE font contains the correct paths.
    If possible, can you explain to me the process of X-windows and fonts? I'm mainly interested in how everything works when a user logs in.
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  5. #5
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    Since you are using Red Hat, can you tell me the exact font name that you see when choosing through a fontselector? I've got verastream ttf fonts installed but they look uglier than usual fonts when I use them.
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  6. #6
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    I wish I knew more about that myself, actually. I think I know how it works with normal X programs and GNOME for pre-2 versions. However, in GNOME2 (and the latter versions of KDE, I think), it's using strange font names that I don't understand where they come from.
    For example, right now it's using a font called "Sans" for all UI stuff, but I have no idea where that name comes from. It seems that GNOME 2 (or if it's just RedHat; I don't know) maps X11 fonts into user-friendlier names, but I have no idea of where to find those font mappings.

    Fonts in X are a rather complicated subject, since many programs don't choose a specific font by its name. Programs choose fonts by 14 selector elements. For example, this specifies a very specific font:
    -adobe-courier-medium-r-normal--10-100-75-75-m-60-iso8859-1
    The elements are seperated by dashes, and the font specification always begins with a dash. I'm no font expert, so I don't really know what all of these mean, but these are the names of the selectors:
    -fndry-fmly-wght-slant-sWdth-adstyl-pxlsz-ptSz-resx-resy-spx-avgWidth-rgstry-encdng
    The ones I know at least vaguely what they mean are these:
    fmly: The font face type, like courier or gothic. As far as I know, many (or maybe even most) of these are standardized by some sort of font organization that isn't specifically related to computers, but type faces in general.
    wght: How bold the font is supposed to be.
    slant: I think this is related to some modifiers like italics, but I'm not sure.
    sWidth: I think this is related to the character width.
    pxlsz: The font height in pixels.
    ptSz: The font height in points (whatever they are again, like 1/20th of an inch or so; like I said, I'm not font expert).
    resx and resy: The horizontal and vertical resolutions in DPI.
    rgstry and encdng: These together make up the character coding, for example rgstry=iso8859 and encdng=1 creates the standard iso8859-1 encoding for western characters (based on ASCII). rgstry=microsoft and encdng=cp1250 selects fonts that have M$'s non-standard Windows codepage 1250 encoding (with the amazing features like opening and closing quotation marks and em dashes), that has messed so much up like many other M$ inventions. See the info on the demoroniser for more info on Microsoft's stupidities.

    I know that in GNOME 1.4, you got to choose fonts by their X11 specifiers, but like I mentioned above, I have no idea how GNOME2 maps these font names that it has into X11 fonts.

    To play around a little with font specifiers, start the xfontsel program.

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    I don't know what it is but it certainly doesn't look as pretty as Red Hat when I'm using these fonts.
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  8. #8
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    In what way? Is the font ugly or is it rendered in an ugly way?

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    I'll take a screenshot of it later but it just seems ugly and doesn't blend in with the system. I've got some other font problems as well regarding Mozilla and HTML and I'll put those up at a later time as well.
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  10. #10
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    Example

    Here is an example of a font that isn't being displayed correctly.

    http://dolda2000.com/~bpark/text.jpg

    The first sentence, should read "Chavo Guerrero say's ...," however for some strange reason, the single quote is always displayed with two dots above a small y. It's not just this problem. There are others but this is the most recognizable one that I found.
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