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Originally Posted by Ozar Originally Posted by josolanes can you tell me whether or not you have some major kde/gnome packages installed (ie: gnome-base, kde-base) just in case there's a ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozar
    Quote Originally Posted by josolanes
    can you tell me whether or not you have some major kde/gnome packages installed (ie: gnome-base, kde-base) just in case there's a program that needs them? I'm wondering if it's safe to completely remove kde (i've removed gnome before the xfce install) or should i leave it? I'd like to save the hd space (though it's not that important) if i can. no need to have something on the system that you don't use
    No, I don't have any KDE or Gnome packages installed, nor do I have any Gnome or KDE libraries. You might not need them either, depending on the packages you wish to use. So whether or not you can delete KDE/Gnome also depends on the packages you wish to use.

    Hope this helps...
    that's exactly what i had hoped for

    i have a pretty fresh install, so i'm pretty sure i won't mess anything up by getting rid of kde (and if i do, i can always install the necessary package later on ).

    thanks!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by budman7
    If you type "nano -w .xinitrc" or whatever your favorite text editor is.

    That will put it in the correct directory, the directory you are in.
    that's what i thought too. this is exactly what i typed, but i'm not sure why it still loads the failsafe terminal:
    Code:
    su -
    (enter root password)
    nano -w .xinitrc
    {enter "startxfce4" into the blank document)
    exit and save
    reboot
    did i type anything wrong? i've tried doing this once or twice before but soon after just quit trying. i'm just curious how it's supposed to work now

    thanks for helping...sorry for asking the question somewhat reduntantly. i just don't see what i'm doing wrong.

    should i have logged in as a user, then typed "su" instead of "su -" so that i stay in that user's home directory?

  3. #13
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    ^^that did it!

    i was supposed to type "su" and not "su -"...supposed to stay in the user's home directory.

    thanks a lot for the advice...now it's a bit easier to start xfce4

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  5. #14
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    You can do that .xinitrc trick with all the WM's, aswell.

    Your .xinitrc needs to be in your user's home dir (/home/user).

    So, say for example you wanted to load Fluxbox with startx, you could do:

    exec /usr/X11R6/bin/./fluxbox

    In your .xinitrc.

    If you don't know the location of the binary, but you know the name, you can do:

    whereis fluxbox (as root for better results)

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Social Burn
    You can do that .xinitrc trick with all the WM's, aswell.

    Your .xinitrc needs to be in your user's home dir (/home/user).

    So, say for example you wanted to load Fluxbox with startx, you could do:

    exec /usr/X11R6/bin/./fluxbox

    In your .xinitrc.

    If you don't know the location of the binary, but you know the name, you can do:

    whereis fluxbox (as root for better results)
    thanks for the info

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