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Hey all, Once in a while, when I had tried GNOME, it would freeze at the GNOME splash screen. There is no way to get around it. I remember reading ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    GNOME freezing at splash screen


    Hey all,

    Once in a while, when I had tried GNOME, it would freeze at the GNOME splash screen. There is no way to get around it. I remember reading somewhere about killing 'gksu' but I couldn't find any running processes last time that happened. I did this because I remember reading that if you leave GNOME and something is using gksu when you leave (and you save the session), gksu will be running behind the splash waiting for a password next time GNOME runs. There is no way that could happen for me because the only thing I would run as root would be from a terminal (ie. editing configuration files or using pacman).

    Any ideas?

    Bryan
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  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    The only time I've experienced something like this is when using an NFS-mounted /home. In my house, my server is under the stairs and the missus' PC is in the bedroom (at the moment - getting a dedicated computer room soon). But the wiring occasionally lets us down. NFS would normally mount at boot up 3 times out of 4, the other time you'd get left with a hanging spash screen at gnome login. My solution was to mount the /home elsewhere and have local homes on that computer, so you had a smooth system yet still have access to your server-based files if needed.

    I doubt that problem is the same as yours but you never know.
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  3. #3
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply,

    Unfortunately, that can't be the cause because, truthfully, I don't even know what NFS is.

    Any other ideas?

    Bryan
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    Queen's University - Arts and Science 2008 (Sociology)
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  4. #4
    oz
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    I rarely run Gnome so can't say what the problem might be but if you really-really want to run Gnome, you should be able to start it from command line with "startx", bypassing GDM.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply ozar,

    Sometimes it would work from GDM, sometimes it wouldn't. This question is more out of perplexity than anything.

    I would like to run GNOME but I am fine with KDE .

    Bryan
    Looking for a distro? Look here.
    "There can be no doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience." - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason)
    Queen's University - Arts and Science 2008 (Sociology)
    Registered Linux User #386147.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryansmith
    Thanks for the reply,

    Unfortunately, that can't be the cause because, truthfully, I don't even know what NFS is.

    Any other ideas?

    Bryan
    NFS is Network File System - it allows you to mount remote partitions as though they are local - directories get exported on the server and listed in the client's fstab.

    It takes tinkering at both ends to set up, so if you dont know what it is, I think that rules it out.

    The situation that I had was that /home was not mounted, causing these problems - there were no user directories available. Is it possible that you have an old hard disk with your /home on it, causing mount problems locally?
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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