Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Hello to everyone, My name is Eddie and I have next to no experience with Linux...that said, just yesterday, myself and 3 EE's here at work decided we were going ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6

    KDE apps not already Finked running on OS X


    Hello to everyone,

    My name is Eddie and I have next to no experience with Linux...that said, just yesterday, myself and 3 EE's here at work decided we were going to start a little Linux club to see how much of our company we can migrate...so I hope to be learning quite a bit in the near future.

    I am a Mac user that has been mulling around with X11 and running KDE on top of OS X trying to get used to the CLI a bit. I use Fink to manage packages. I think this means that the kind programmers and hackers associated with it need to port it first, before it will run correctly on OS X...am I right there? I ask this because I have found other KDE apps that I would like to work with which are not currently on the Fink list of items.

    For someone with no programming experience, what would it take to get a particular KDE app to run in OS X with X11? Is it as straight forward as downloading the source, compiling and running? Or should I just be patient and learn how to correctly 'port' something? I am hoping the combination of my own interest in learning C and my new Linux club at work I will be able to figure this stuff out sooner rather than later.

    Thanks for you help,
    Eddie

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Since Mac OS X is UNIX in the ground, it _should_ work if you just get the source and compile it. However, I know that Mac OS X is a bit peculiar in its basic designs, and there are many reports of programs that need very special solutions to work under OSX. I don't use Mac, though, so I don't know any specifics (If you give me a PowerMac, I'd be happy to try it for you. =) ).

    You know, there are Linux distributions for Macs as well, so you might want to try Linux on your favorite hardware platfrom. Check out YellowDog Linux, which is RedHat ported to PPC, or Penguin PPC, which is a general site for information about Linux on Macs and other PPC architectures. Debian is also available for Macs, if I recall correctly.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6
    Thanks Dolda,

    I have gotten quite close to installing Linux on the Mac, but each time I chicken out and don't do it. The only reason I haven't yet is that my wife and I use this system for our Photography & Design business. Knowing so little right now about Linux, I can't take the risk of knocking this computer out of commision at all. That's part of the reason I jumped at the opportunity at work to get involved with the Linux project. I hope to learn what I can here and then assess my options for home.


    Better yet, I would like to get a PowerBook and then I could mess it up all I want with no chance of injury from my wife! But that's a bit off...for now I will just learn at work.

    I have heard the same things about OS X being a bit funny about how things are put together. That said, you have given me enough info to give it a shot. If it doesn't work, maybe I can learn something trying to figure out why.

    Thanks for the help and friendly intro to this forum...I look forward to becoming an asset-instead of a liability-to this group in the future!

    Eddie

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    When a PC user wants to try Linux out, I usually recommend to him that he should buy a secondary hard drive and only install Linux to that one to avoid damaging his existing system. As far as I know, Macs also use IDE drives (right?), so in that way, I think I could recommend the same for you. Most Linux distros allow you to create a boot floppy instead of installing a boot loader on the boot drive. That way your system is even more unaffected.

    However, I'm not exactly sure how these things work on a Mac. I guess you should be the authority on that area.

    Again, if you give me a PowerMac, I'd be more than happy to try it for you. =)

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6
    That's the other option that I was considering. I think that might end up being the quickest solution for getting Linux up and running. Thanks again.

    As for sending you a PowerMac:

    I would, except I can't afford the shipping

    And my wife would kill me...so even if you paid the shipping, I'd still be dead and couldn't enjoy the good feeling I am sure I would get from helping you out.

    See, it's impossible. Sorry!

    Thanks again Dolda...
    Eddie

  7. #6
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Awww, too bad. =)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •