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S3V? What is that? To change the resolution, try using "Xconfigurator." As I haven't used RH 5, I don't know if that version has that tool built in but you ...
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  1. #11
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    S3V? What is that?

    To change the resolution, try using "Xconfigurator." As I haven't used RH 5, I don't know if that version has that tool built in but you can give it a try.

    If all else fails, you can edit the /etc/X11/XF86Config file under the section "sreen" by finding your default color and then editing the modes. Since I use color 24, here's what mine looks like:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
            Identifier      "Default Screen"
            Device          "NVIDIA Geforce 2"
            Monitor         "SyncMaster 170MP"
            DefaultDepth    24
            SubSection "Display"
                    Depth           1
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
            SubSection "Display"
                    Depth           4
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
            SubSection "Display"
                    Depth           8
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
            SubSection "Display"
                    Depth           15
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
            SubSection "Display"
                    Depth           16
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
                    Depth           24
                    Modes           "1280x1024"
            EndSubSection
    Since I use 24, the only thing that really matters is the resolution under that mode.
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  2. #12
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    Change the modes to : "1024x768 800x600 640x480"
    This will start default in 1024x768 and with ctrl+alt and the plus and minus keys on your keypad you'll be able to switch screen resolutions.

    ---[ MS09-99896 - Vulnerability in All MS Windows OS ; Using Windows Could Allow Remote Code Execution. ]---
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  3. #13
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    xconfigurator is not installed on my distro, i tried this as soon as i found out i might be abgle to get it to woork like that.
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  4. #14
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    I believe it's case sensitive. It should be "Xconfigurator" if I remember it correctly.
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  5. #15
    Linux Newbie
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    thanks for all the help :D :D

    score!
    startx now uses the SVGA server, thnks guys.
    by the way, can any one recomend a console text editor? i will need one to edit that file manualy.

    thanks for all the help, most grateful

    tr_wright1
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  6. #16
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    Well, I used to hate using vi but I'm getting used to it. I find emacs to be the best editor I've ever used in my life but vi is always available (after the initial installation) and it really doesn't use up a lot of memory like emacs.

    Because vi is a bit hard to use (takes time to get used to), you might want to use something like pico or nano (pico clone).
    The best things in life are free.

  7. #17
    Linux Newbie
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    vi, hard, you don't say

    i tried to edit /etc/inittab with vi but i couldn't use it at all.
    Cry out for freedom! Cry out for Linux!

  8. #18
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    You could try and install pine and that will give you pico which is a nice simple text editor.

    Or in vi to use the arrow keys to get where you want to edit the file press i to enter insert mode, make your changes then hit esc twice to make sure your out of insert mode then type :wq to write the file and then quit vi

  9. #19
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    You could always install the Gnu Nano text editor, which is a totally GPLed clone of pico.

    http://www.nano-editor.org/download.html

  10. #20
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    console text editor: vim

    you will probably have to read the docs for it, because it doesn't *seem* intuitive at first.. but once you get used to it, it is a very powerful editor.
    Their code will be beautiful, even if their desks are buried in 3 feet of crap. - esr

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