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Hello, I am using KDE3.5.5 for quite a long time and noticed one strange thing-the size of the ~/.kde directory has increased considerably (up to 1.7 GB). I tried to ...
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  1. #1
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    How to clean KDE


    Hello,

    I am using KDE3.5.5 for quite a long time and noticed one strange thing-the size of the ~/.kde directory has increased considerably (up to 1.7 GB). I tried to look for the files and found that mostly these are auxiliary .log-files and settings. For example , ~/.kde/share/apps/kget/logs/ contains information on all downloads I ever made, files ~/.kde/share/apps/kdesktop/IconPosition contain information on all the files I ever had on my desktop [but have deleted] etc.

    My question is-are there any tools to remove such outdated "auxiliary files" ???
    In principle, I can delete them manually, but (1) there are too many files and (2) I am afraid that KDE will have problems after such "surgery". As a last resort, I can delete the whole directory ~/.kde and re-login, but I wonder if there are less radical methods.

    Thanks in advance,
    Xaleandr

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    try Kleansweep.

    Description:
    File cleaner for KDE
    KleanSweep allows you to reclaim disk space by finding unneeded files. It can search for files basing on several criterias; you can seek for:
    empty files
    empty directories
    backup files
    broken symbolic links
    broken executables (executables with missing libraries)
    dead menu entries (.desktop files pointing to non-existing executables)
    duplicated files
    orphaned files -- files not found in RPM (for rpm-based distros, e.g. Fedora Core, Suse) or DPKG (for dpkg based distros, e.g. Debian and Ubuntu) database
    obsolete thumbnails (thumbnails conforming to freedesktop.org standard, pointing to non-existing images)
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils_casper View Post
    try Kleansweep.

    Description:
    Thanks a lot, but it seems not exactly what I need. I am speaking about "logs/settings" files kept in $HOME/.kde/share/.../* (they aren't .desktop-files). For example, have a look in
    /home/Xaleandr/.kde/share/apps/kdesktop, there You will find a huge number of files named
    IconPosition***.new, where ***=random numbers/letters with information on what files You ever had on You desktop. Or take another example-/home/Xaleandr/.kde/share/apps/kdesktop.
    This directory contains information on the files You opened in .xml-form.

    Nevertheless, thank You very much for the link,
    I guess in general the program KleanSweep is useful, I 'll try it .

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    I had a similar problem in the past. I had chosen the basic files of my programs in .kde (the Ctrl key pressed permits individual selection) and copied them out of .kde. Then I had selected all the files (in each subdirectory of .kde) and deleted them and eventually I had put the copied files back into their position.
    It worked perfectly.

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    Hello,

    Quote Originally Posted by g.ivannov View Post
    I had a similar problem in the past. I had chosen the basic files of my programs in .kde (the Ctrl key pressed permits individual selection) and copied them out of .kde. Then I had selected all the files (in each subdirectory of .kde) and deleted them and eventually I had put the copied files back into their position.
    It worked perfectly.
    Thank You very much for the reply.
    But I do not understand two points:
    1) How did You choose all the "essential" files ???
    2) Didn't You have problems with KDE afterwards ???
    I remember I also made this (about ~1 year ago), but after that there were numerous complaints from KDE-based applications that something is missing and even a data loss in some apps [KAddressBook being most unpleasant].

    The problem is that "data" files do not have a fixed name, but rather a fixed name + random suffix, so if You simply delete ~/.kde, re-login and copy the old settings, KDE will ignore them. In this case You 'll need to "import" the old data back to each application. (For example, (as far as I remember) KAddressbook keeps each contact in a separate file .vcf-file, so You have to import each contact separately. The same is true for KMail -each letter is kept in a separate file)

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    I dont use kde now; so I will tell you what I remember. In the subdirectory apps you will recognize the folders of the applications you use. If you have apps that store data like korganizer, kjots etc it is there where they do it. You keep them
    The configuration files are in the subdirectory config and they are ending in rc; you keep them. A folder named Ressources has essential data. Open and verify to see what you have to keep. Well I admit it needs some experience to recognize the basic files. I would delete the rest of files (sending it to the trashcan; not permanently) In a little days I would see what was missing to put it back to its place)

    There is another methode if you have time: Open another user account and run your applications once. In your .kde you will see the essential files.

    PS If you use kleansweep, it needs extreme precaution with system files. Your system may become useless.

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