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Greetings, I have downloaded and used the live DesktopBSD but I donīt know how to mount a USB pendrive. Can somebody tell me how to do that? I have tried ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie daacosta's Avatar
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    USB not detected/mounted by Live DesktopBSD DVD


    Greetings,

    I have downloaded and used the live DesktopBSD but I donīt know how to mount a USB pendrive. Can somebody tell me how to do that? I have tried using the GUI for this but the USB pendrive is not detected.

    Thanks!
    -D-

    Registered User # 402675

  2. #2
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    what you see when you run
    lsusb
    if you can see your usb device then mounting is easy
    do:
    mkdir /mount/usb
    mount -t vfat /dev/sda1 /mnt/usb

    replace sda1 with your actual parititon name on which you want to mount.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    Post the results of dmesg | grep 'da[0-9]'

    What we're looking for is a device like da0, da1, etc. associated with your usb drive.

    Assuming the device is da0, you'd most likely mount it this way (as root):
    # mount -t msdosfs /dev/da0s1 /mnt/usb-drive

    Of course you can mount it to a different directory if /mnt/usb-drive does not exist (or you can create it).

    Type msdosfs is used because almost all usb drives are formatted with fat32 (or other MS compatible filesystems). The device da0s1 is used because FreeBSD normally recognizes usb drives' first slice.

    You can mount as a normal user too, but some additional steps are needed (changing a sysctl MIB) and that's probably not useful on a live cd.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    P.S. Remember to umount the drive when finished (and before pulling it out).

    # umount /dev/da0s1

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie daacosta's Avatar
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    Thank you very much for your help:

    Code:
    desktopbsd# dmesg | grep 'da[0-9]'
    da0 at umass-sim0 bus 0 target 0 lun 0
    da0: <Imation Nano PMAP> Removable Direct Access SCSI-0 device
    da0: 40.000MB/s transfers
    da0: 3935MB (8058880 512 byte sectors: 255H 63S/T 501C)
    GEOM_LABEL: Label for provider da0s1 is msdosfs/Nano.
    desktopbsd#
    So DesktopBSD sees the USB drive. Mounting it wasn't difficult either but I am not sure whether the directory I chose was fine or not /root/DesktopBSD


    Quote Originally Posted by anomie View Post
    Post the results of dmesg | grep 'da[0-9]'

    What we're looking for is a device like da0, da1, etc. associated with your usb drive.

    Assuming the device is da0, you'd most likely mount it this way (as root):
    # mount -t msdosfs /dev/da0s1 /mnt/usb-drive

    Of course you can mount it to a different directory if /mnt/usb-drive does not exist (or you can create it).

    Type msdosfs is used because almost all usb drives are formatted with fat32 (or other MS compatible filesystems). The device da0s1 is used because FreeBSD normally recognizes usb drives' first slice.

    You can mount as a normal user too, but some additional steps are needed (changing a sysctl MIB) and that's probably not useful on a live cd.
    -D-

    Registered User # 402675

  6. #6
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daacosta
    ... I am not sure whether the directory I chose was fine or not /root/DesktopBSD
    "Traditionally" you mount external drives to a /mnt subdirectory. But what you chose is just fine. (In this case it really does not matter *.)

    * Caveat: Bear in mind that the directory you mount a filesystem to will become temporarily overlaid. This is non-destructive, and the old contents will be back once you umount said filesystem.

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