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OpenBSD 4 I have read the readme after the install, and I want to know what suggestions there are for a new user of OpenBSD on what to do? The ...
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    Open BSD, suggestions for new user??


    OpenBSD 4

    I have read the readme after the install, and I want to know what suggestions there are for a new user of OpenBSD on what to do? The Windowing system seems poor after the install, because some other readme files indicated that the system is only tested without the third party software extras. I can run it in console mode, but want to know what else I can do with OpenBSD and still have the tested features.

    For starters, the vi system does not show a prompt, and I can not tell what line the cursor is on when I edit a file. Is this the way it is supposed to be? The settings are mostly the default installation settings, except for some few changes mentioned in the readme file.

    What is the tested Windowing system for OpenBSD, and are the main web browsers tested with it? One readme said the system is secure right out of the box. Does it have a firewall running right out of the box? I did the standard install.

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    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    It's secure right out of the box mostly because it's not running services. I'm not sure if the default configuration has any firewall enabled - look at /etc/pf.conf. That would have the PacketFilter (firewall) configuration, if it is enabled.

    All the BSDs pretty much adopt the same attitude when it comes to packages: They are responsible for the base system. There is a different team responsible for the packages (ports, pkgsrc). The packages should build, but I'm pretty sure there's not much in-depth testing.

    That said, you should be able to run anything in OpenBSD ports on your system without too many problems. I haven't run Open in a desktop environment, so I don't have any first-hand experience for you there. I just ran it as a firewall and server (headless). HTH
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    I just ran it as a firewall
    What packet filter does OpenBSD 4 use? Is it like Linux with ipchains or iptables?

    Any idea how to reconfigure the shell and vi? I can't see the prompt in vi?

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    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gos9x View Post
    What packet filter does OpenBSD 4 use? Is it like Linux with ipchains or iptables?

    Any idea how to reconfigure the shell and vi? I can't see the prompt in vi?
    It runs Packet Filter (pf). It was written by the OpenBSD crew, and FreeBSD has since adopted it (maybe Net, too). You can use 'chsh' to change your shell after you have installed another one (bash, zsh, etc.) from ports.

    Not sure about the vi issue...you can't see the block prompt at all? Could you possibly snap a picture of the screen? That's a odd issue indeed...
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    Does packet filter use either "ipchains" or "iptables"?

    The vi issue is after a default install without any new configuration changes. A snapshot would not help, you would just see the file that I was trying to edit without a prompt. Did your install of OpenBSD have that problem with vi?

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    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gos9x View Post
    Does packet filter use either "ipchains" or "iptables"?

    The vi issue is after a default install without any new configuration changes. A snapshot would not help, you would just see the file that I was trying to edit without a prompt. Did your install of OpenBSD have that problem with vi?
    I've never seen that issue with vi. Does it happen with vim, or have you not installed it yet?

    No, pf is a completely different implementation that ipchains was or iptables is. The code is 100% different (I'd assume...), and the utilities and configurations are also 100% different (better, imho).
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    It was from a default install of OpenBSD. From the shell, "vi file.txt", then vi starts with a new file and there is no prompt or the prompt is the same as the background so I can not see it. This is for command and for insert mode. If I insert some text, then I can see it inserting, but no prompt. How can I configure vi so that I can see the prompt? This is all default settings for vi.

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    I just installed 4.4 network install after reading how much more secure the system is and also iptables pissed me off I know im not a moron but way too much crap to deal with just to secure my network LOL...

    Anyway my openbsd 4.4 did the same thing, I just decided to do the ports thing and installed pico. I dont know if my issue was cause i installed the base system then restarted it without the head and now I ssh into it. But my VI never worked for me.

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    Hi am stil figering out wich distro i wanna use with my needs but in bsd i think a good desktop option is the PC-BSD on PC-BSD - Home and as hardware firewall/router pfsense those are best for new user.
    Myself is also strugling with things ass installing firewall ,antivirus and cloning mac address [wich changes after a reboot] stil hard choice to run linux or bsd so thats why i am here to hear tips from the experts!

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    Just Joined! malcarada's Avatar
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    OpenBSD is not the most friendly of BSDs for newbies,. There are a few live OpenBSD CDs that come with a full desktop that you may want to play with.

    BSDAnywhere is a good choice.

    You may also want to look at OpenBSD101 a site with many OpenBSD tutorials from begginers to advanced users.

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