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I have recently been trying out some of the recent BSD's like PC-BSD, FreeBSD, FreeSBIE & NetBSD. I really liked FreeSBIE for its compact and easy use, but unfortunately transferring ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    I have recently been trying out some of the recent BSD's like PC-BSD, FreeBSD, FreeSBIE & NetBSD. I really liked FreeSBIE for its compact and easy use, but unfortunately transferring it to hard disk & updating the packages to the latest release would be harder than installing PC-BSD.

    You should try PC-BSD if you just want an easy test of a unix (BSD) distro, or unless you want the whole challenge of learning unix command & compiling of ports, packages and possibly a GUI go with the FreeBSD or NetBSD, i personally found NetBSD easier to understand & less trouble than FreeBSD (although i must admit the guide from FreeBSD did help a lot).

    Gotta love (Oracle) Solaris its an awesome OS, definitely should give it a try, it is different from the BSD's as useful free software too on Oracle's site, such the Media Studio 12.2.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by meton_magis View Post
    they Oracalized it (made the "open" part of it mean nothing.)

    they now have a trial version of their Solaris software.

    Unless you need a testbed specifically for Solaris, I'd avoid it like the plague.

    but that's just my 2c
    I am unclear as to this information, the software is not trial, you do have to register and agree to a statement but you can find the downloads here. They wont let me post a url but if you google Solaris downloads find the Oracle site map and in the section marked Oracle Technology Network under that is a link for downloads, on that page go the section marker 'Servers and Storage Systems' under that you will see links for Solaris and Solaris 11 Express. I do agree that Solaris is not a cake walk but if you are learning it is valuable and will provide one of the most stable OS's out there. The install is a little whiney, the biggest of wich is that make sure you backup other info especially if this is a dual boot. The disk set up is very particular, when you get into the setup and it comes to the partitioning it almost always complains about the disk, you should have a seperate disk for the install and hand it over to solaris to partition. I haven't had a lot of luck sharing the disk unless I install the other OS's later. During install you can actaully stop when you ge to the desktop if that is the type of install you chose and restart after you partition, if this is a situation where you have a couple of disks you will find identity tough, so remeber the command 'iostat -iE -n' this will list the devices and you can identify the disks by serial number. You dont have like blkid or ls /dev/disk/by-label etc. Hope this helps.

    --jerry

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    jk121960 is right Oracle Solaris is a really stable distro, but as others have said its hardware support is limited.

    You could try Openindiana, i have noticed that its hardware support is slightly better than Oracle's and they are run the same Kernel version (snv_151a) also if its a big issue OpenIndiana is fully open source.

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  5. #14
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    If you want to tinker with something thats not Linux based, then I suggest you look at FreeBSD. Its well documented and I think its as easy to setup and use as most Linux distros if you have a bit of experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DKing0 View Post
    I'd like to learn and use a unix like OS. I'm already familiar with CentOS and Debian/Ubuntu and would like to start with something that's easy and "beginner" friendly. With the aforementioned in mind does it make more sense to start with FreeBsd or OpenSolaris? Thanks.
    Cut your teeth on FreeBSD - good community support and documentation then once use to it then explore other BSD's

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nixblog View Post
    Cut your teeth on FreeBSD - good community support and documentation then once use to it then explore other BSD's
    Absolutely correct, especially about the documentation. The only other *NIX system I've found to have comparable docs is NetBSD, but FreeBSD actually has ease of use as one of it's major goals.

    Understand this is not necessarily ease of use in the same terms as "point and click", but ease of use in terms of a consistent and easy to learn way of doing things. And point and click isn't hard to achieve either - the default install can optionally give you a full desktop system with Gnome or KDE.

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