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How can I enable my regular user account to log in using su ? Is there a permissions file I need to edit? It's really getting old having to log ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Root logins and su **SOLVED**


    How can I enable my regular user account to log in using su? Is there a permissions file I need to edit? It's really getting old having to log out completely and log back in as root to edit my xorg.conf and whatnot.

    I'm running FreeBSD 5.4-RELEASE by the way, i386 architecture.
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  2. #2
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    i reckon you could edit your user group to give your user account full root access but then why not just use your root account all the time if youre going to do that? (you wouldnt do this for obvious reasons).

    ive never needed to logout and login as root to edit a file before (that i can recall). im sure ive always been able to su to do it. anyway i think the best thing would be to change ownership or permissions to the files you regularly find yourself needing to edit.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha_dk
    im sure ive always been able to su to do it. anyway i think the best thing would be to change ownership or permissions to the files you regularly find yourself needing to edit.
    See, that's not what I want to do, nor should I have to. I want to enable my regular user to log in using su so that I can then edit the files without having to expose my system to the security risks associated with adding regular user edit permission to system files. Surely there's something simple I need to do to give my user the ability to run su.

    UPDATE: I did some googling and found that I need to add my regular user to the wheel group in order to be able to use su. I'll give that a shot tonight. I also just realized that this has been asked before in this thread. *whistles nonchalantly* I'll do a search next time.
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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer adrenaline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Quote Originally Posted by alpha_dk
    im sure ive always been able to su to do it. anyway i think the best thing would be to change ownership or permissions to the files you regularly find yourself needing to edit.
    See, that's not what I want to do, nor should I have to. I want to enable my regular user to log in using su so that I can then edit the files without having to expose my system to the security risks associated with adding regular user edit permission to system files. Surely there's something simple I need to do to give my user the ability to run su.

    UPDATE: I did some googling and found that I need to add my regular user to the wheel group in order to be able to use su. I'll give that a shot tonight. I also just realized that this has been asked before in this thread. *whistles nonchalantly* I'll do a search next time.
    Good eye TechieMoe
    Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had.
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