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View Poll Results: Do you think PC-BSD is a great idea?

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Originally Posted by sether I have a few issues with PC-BSD: Linux came first as a free software alternative for the desktop. While the idea of a BSD derived operating ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sether
    I have a few issues with PC-BSD:
    • Linux came first as a free software alternative for the desktop. While the idea of a BSD derived operating system for the desktop is interesting and worth pursuing, I don't see PC-BSD becoming prominent in the desktop market anytime soon. It's not that I have a problem with using BSD as a desktop operating system, it's just that if the free software community wants to pose a challenge to Microsoft's Windows, more effort should be contributed to the already growing Linux movement. BSD is going to continue to stay on servers (where it belongs).
    • The installer is licensed under the GPL. I understand why they had to do this (the issue with Qt licensing), but aren't the GPL and BSD licenses conflicting ideologies?

    I know these issues are trivial and not worth arguing about, but I figured I would just bring them up since we were on the topic of PC-BSD criticisms. Other than that, PC-BSD is a great idea.
    I think that *BSD can be good or bad on the desktop, depending on the user, Ive seen people using OpenBSD (yes, openbsd) on their desktops, and damm, it looks good. *BSD needs more tweaking for the desktop, which In turn agrees with what you said, for the average home desktop, Linux is the way to go for challenging Windows.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by !=
    Quote Originally Posted by sether
    I have a few issues with PC-BSD:
    • Linux came first as a free software alternative for the desktop. While the idea of a BSD derived operating system for the desktop is interesting and worth pursuing, I don't see PC-BSD becoming prominent in the desktop market anytime soon. It's not that I have a problem with using BSD as a desktop operating system, it's just that if the free software community wants to pose a challenge to Microsoft's Windows, more effort should be contributed to the already growing Linux movement. BSD is going to continue to stay on servers (where it belongs).
    • The installer is licensed under the GPL. I understand why they had to do this (the issue with Qt licensing), but aren't the GPL and BSD licenses conflicting ideologies?

    I know these issues are trivial and not worth arguing about, but I figured I would just bring them up since we were on the topic of PC-BSD criticisms. Other than that, PC-BSD is a great idea.
    I think that *BSD can be good or bad on the desktop, depending on the user, Ive seen people using OpenBSD (yes, openbsd) on their desktops, and damm, it looks good. *BSD needs more tweaking for the desktop, which In turn agrees with what you said, for the average home desktop, Linux is the way to go for challenging Windows.
    Yes, I agree.

    A point of clarification: I've used FreeBSD and OpenBSD on my desktop machine for the past 2 years without any issues (other than the fact that I had to do a lot of reading to understand what I was doing :P ). But for an easy-to-use desktop solution, I don't see what's wrong with Linux .

  3. #13
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    I usually like a bit of choice / friendly rivalry. In this case I have to agree, /bsd does great on servers, we all love it. Linux has been working for the desktop for years now. And most of the GNU / Xorg / Whatever elements for the desktop have really been designed with linux in mind even if they do say for Unix on them.

  4. #14
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    Oh well, I guess I need to find another box. I really do need to go back and try one of the BSD flavors again.

    Is it a concensus that PC-BSD is the most stable distribution. Stability is important to me. Ease of installation is secondary.

    Jeff
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  5. #15
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    pc-bsd is a freebsd that has an easy installer, that is quite effective...if ease of installation is not the most important thing to you, then maybe you would like to check out openbsd, which is known for both security and stability
    Operating System: GNU Emacs

  6. #16
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    The one thing I disliked about PC-BSD 0.7.8 is that a Distro this new doesn't support something as common as an USB mouse. My T40 laptop doesn't have a PS2 or Serial port and I can't stand using the trackpoint.
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  7. #17
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    one thing: the various BSD's are not 'distros'.. they are fully-fledged OS's based upon the same codebase..

    Linux distributions are the same OS with different packages and config styles..
    Their code will be beautiful, even if their desks are buried in 3 feet of crap. - esr

  8. #18
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    Ok, then you would think that something that was built would already have the USB mouse support in the kernel. I haven't used a PS2 mouse in 3 or 4 years.
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    Ok, then you would think that something that was built would already have the USB mouse support in the kernel. I haven't used a PS2 mouse in 3 or 4 years.
    Well my usb mouse has worked in Free/Net/OpenBSD, so I dont know why it doesnt work in PC-BSD.

  10. #20
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    It's a MS wireless notebook optical mouse. It's recognized under /dev/uhid0 but not as /dev/ums0.
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