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...can some one explain the harddisk/partition naming scheme that freeBSD uses? im confused. i know it something like ad0s10 or something like that, but linux's naming is easy to follow ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    i dont get it...


    ...can some one explain the harddisk/partition naming scheme that freeBSD uses? im confused.

    i know it something like ad0s10 or something like that, but linux's naming is easy to follow (eg hda3), i would like to know what all those numbers mean in the freebsd naming scheme.

    thanks
    /weed
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
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  2. #2
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    I'm not a BSD user, but the FreeBSD handbook may be able to help: http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...ooks/handbook/

    Bryan
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  3. #3
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Nor am I a BSD user, but having struggled through the FreeBSD install recently (and regretting it soon after), here's what I understand/believe:

    The scheme is such as ad0s1a.

    The ad# indicates the hard drive. So whereas we have hda, hdb, they have ad0, ad1.

    The s# is the slice number. Near as I can tell, a slice is a space of the hard drive that works similarly to a logical partition. That is, it is a container for other partitions.

    The letter on the end is the actual partition (a la hda1). So within ad0s1, I could have a / partition, a /home partition, a /boot partition, and a swap partition. These would be ad0s1a, ad0s1b, etc.


    If any BSD'er wants to prove me wrong, please do.

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  5. #4
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    I believe you're quite correct Cabhan.

    What Linux calls partitions , BSD calls them slices, so there are 4 slices for each
    harddrive. So the term

    ad1s3b

    is saying .....the second partition in the third slice of the second IDE disk drive.

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    thanks guys, i get it now (i think)!

    thanks again guys

    /weed
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  7. #6
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    I've actually found the FreeBSD naming system easier to follow.
    Probably because it was the first one I studied.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan
    The s# is the slice number. Near as I can tell, a slice is a space of the hard drive that works similarly to a logical partition. That is, it is a container for other partitions.

    The letter on the end is the actual partition (a la hda1). So within ad0s1, I could have a / partition, a /home partition, a /boot partition, and a swap partition. These would be ad0s1a, ad0s1b, etc.
    The container-partition is named "extended" partition which contains the so-called "logical" partitions

    Some of the partition letters are reserved thought: IIRC ad0s1a will always be a /-partition, ad0s1b a swap-partition and ad0s1c a name to access the whole disk (like just /dev/hda in linux) regardless of which physical order they are in. ad0s1d, ad0s1e etc will be other partitions you've made on the slice.

    I also find the BSD naming scheme nice and easy. The letters all stand for something:

    ATA-Disk 0 Slice 1 partition b

    For a SCSI-disk (or USB-memory stick etc) it's "da0" instead of "ad0" (iirc it's for SCSI Direct-Access).

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