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... and the f**king thing doesn't work. To start off, I let disklabel auto setup the correct partitions (or slices or whatever), that was my first mistake. I ran out ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    Angry Just installed freebsd...


    ... and the f**king thing doesn't work.

    To start off, I let disklabel auto setup the correct partitions (or slices or whatever), that was my first mistake. I ran out of space.

    Take 2 with the install, this time there was just enough space, but it would not boot.

    Take 3, allowed more space & feels better, but still won't boot.

    I disconnected my Prim. Master, and it booted, but of course, fstab was set to the old settings, so it couldn't find & mount the root partition.

    After a close look, I noticed that It can't find it's own F**king partition. I need help urgently, as I am about to take the whole machine out to my shed, and give it a go with a sledgehammer.

    The error is: "can't find 'kernel'". It is installed on my Prim. Slave.

    Ooh, I am ready to kill it, and smash my cd's.

    ~ weed
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
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  2. #2
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    If you have a spare harddrive, I'd recommend wiping it and letting BSD do all its own partitioning. Also make sure you install the BSD bootloader when it prompts you. What version of FreeBSD were you trying to install?
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  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    It was Freebsd 6.1-release, it was released (I think) around the 8th of May.

    I don't know whether that is a good idea to let it take up a whole hard drive. I don't trust disklabel after the huge mistake it make with /usr. It made it 400mb, when I needed about 2gb.

    But no matter what, it still should boot.

    Sorry for my outburst, I had high expectations of this (just like suse 10.0).

    Ok, i'll give your method a go. It shouldn't take too long, after all this will be the 4th one in 6 hours .

    Thanks for your suggestion techieMoe!
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
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  4. #4
    drl
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    Hi, Weedman.

    Encouragement post.

    According to my log, I installed FreeBSD 6.1 on May 10th. I usually install to separate disks (as techieMoe suggests) because I have found it to be the least risky. I use frame/carrier hard-disk systems for this. I have a pile of 4 GB ATA disks for practice and experimentation.

    The problems I ran into were:

    1) too little space in /usr, as you found. I re-allocated to 1 GB and it worked for me. In retrospect, I probably could have forgone the "ports" install, since that took a lot of time and space.

    2) could not get the boot loader installed. To be fair, this disk had BeOS 5 installed, and its bootloader apparently is ... non-standard. I finally booted a W2K install disk, and ran fixmbr. The FreeBSD bootloader then installed correctly.

    After that, things seem to go as I expected.

    Best wishes; keep us posted ... cheers, drl
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weedman
    I don't know whether that is a good idea to let it take up a whole hard drive. I don't trust disklabel after the huge mistake it make with /usr. It made it 400mb, when I needed about 2gb.
    If your ultimate goal is just to get a functional system installed, little details like this are irrelevant. Let the installer make whatever partitions in whatever sizes it wants and it should go off without a hitch. After you're more familiar with FreeBSD or just BSD in general then you can start tweaking stuff. I recommend this approach for new Linux users as well.
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  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    If your ultimate goal is just to get a functional system installed, little details like this are irrelevant. Let the installer make whatever partitions in whatever sizes it wants and it should go off without a hitch. After you're more familiar with FreeBSD or just BSD in general then you can start tweaking stuff. I recommend this approach for new Linux users as well.
    Thanks.

    I let the installer use my the whole hdd. It's only 8gb, but it actually corrected the error it made b4, and made my /usr partition 4gb.

    After the install:
    My jaw stayed open for about 2 minutes. Thanks techiemoe, you actually got me a working FreeBSD system!

    I owe you big time for that.

    And thank you drl for the encouraging post. I know that I wasn't the only person that went through this.

    Thanks both of you, for your help & support.

    One last question, The only differences I could think of was that the bootloader was installed into the mbr of hda or ad0 instead of hdb or ad1, and that the 2 partitions on the hdd (1 ext3 for slack, 1 swap) were deleted. Surely, it shouldn't throw up such a fuss because of that?
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
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  7. #7
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    Of course, FreeBSD plays nicely, but I installed grub via ports so I could dualboot properly, and it refuses to work.

    All I can say is that I was forced to remove the hd from that pc, and put it in another. Now the whole system goes all queer, an it appears that I will have to reinstall. At least this time it won't be so painful. Hell, I think I am starting to like FreeBSD a lot now. It let/made me rediscover the worthiness of KDE.

    It feels like I am a n00b again. And I like it.

    Another question, How do I mount ext3 partitions?
    I enabled the kernel module "ext2fs", but I still can't mount them.

    It gives me some message like "invaid parameter"

    I give it
    Code:
    mount -t ext2fs /dev/ad0s1 /linux/gentoo
    It doesn't look wrong...
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
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  8. #8
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    Try this, it'll make your life easier:
    http://www.pcbsd.org

    A desktop version of FreeBSD.

    deltatux

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast Weedman's Avatar
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    I am hella short on bandwidth, so downloading that would be impossible.

    I think i'll stick with freebsd for the moment, to get my feet wet, & for street cred .
    "Time has more than one meaning, and is more than one dimension" - /.unknown
    --Registered Linux user #396583--

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    If you have a spare harddrive, I'd recommend wiping it and letting BSD do all its own partitioning. Also make sure you install the BSD bootloader when it prompts you. What version of FreeBSD were you trying to install?
    If you're dealing with a non-critical desktop machine, I see no benefit from breaking your filesystem up into partitions further than this:

    /boot - 100m
    swap - 512m (or whatever you want)
    / - whatever is left over


    Having a separate /usr, /home, /var, and whatever else only leaves room for headaches for a new user.

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