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I installed the X during the setup. Do I need to install it again?...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie
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    I installed the X during the setup. Do I need to install it again?

  2. #12
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    No, just follow the steps in the handbook carefully.

    It'd be obvious if you did not have X installed, because the first command to start configuring X would not work - Xorg -configure

  3. #13
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    I have understood how to install kde offline.
    I am comfortable with editing the conf files.

    I did install X again from sysinstall.

    I am using vmware.

    Because in real mode, it stucks at boot menu and when system restarts after completion of installation. I tried so many times. In vmware it doesn't stuck on boot after reebot of installation completion.

    I do have xorg.conf of installed linux distro. Can I use that?

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  5. #14
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    I do have xorg.conf of installed linux distro. Can I use that?
    Possibly, but I'm not sure. I wonder if some things (e.g. font paths) would be different.

    My advice is to stick to the handbook instructions. They'll walk you through how to do this one step at a time.

  6. #15
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    Xorg -configure hangs
    So I tried this guide
    http://www.vmunix.com/fbsd-book/Xwindows.phtml

    It does not installed xf86config as mentioned.
    So I tried this
    cd /usr/ports/x11/XFree86
    make install

    This gives some error.

    I am stuck.

    I think Xorg -configure may work in real mode but in real mode, FreeBSD doesn't boot after installation.

    Can we troubleshoot this?

    I have also tried 3 live cd's Freesbie, netbsd live cd, trueBSD
    They didn't worked as well.

    Now I am downloading pcbsd vmware image.
    Then I will try desktop BSD.

    One q.
    When ports have source what does it fetch from ftp with make install.

  7. #16
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    Thanks for the support.

    I have the kde working now


    I have 2 questions.

    1. Why does ports fetch from ftp when it has the sources installed?
    2. I had a crush on slackware and have a feeling that FreeBSD is even better than it. Please share your view and Is it better than Linux?

    Thanks again

  8. #17
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    1. Why does ports fetch from ftp when it has the sources installed?
    See man ports. Each port will fetch any needed files that it does not already have on disk.

    If you're curious to see in advance which files a port will need to fetch in order to build, you can use:
    Code:
    $ cd /usr/ports/port_path_here && make fetch-recursive-list
    2. I had a crush on slackware and have a feeling that FreeBSD is even better than it. Please share your view and Is it better than Linux?
    First let me say that I'm heavily invested in GNU/Linux. I use it frequently at home and at work. I'm a current RHCE. I read books and articles about it, and I'm happy about its success. It's the thing that got me introduced into the *nix world, period.

    IMO, FreeBSD is a far superior OS. FreeBSD:
    • Is laid out logically -- ports enforce installations to certain directories, making programs and config files easier to find.
    • Comes with a more secure initial installation. It also includes some important tools (securelevels, several flexible firewall choices, jails) to harden it further.
    • Has a license that I agree with more.
    • Doesn't break when I upgrade the base system.
    • Uses a software managment system (ports) that has always worked well for me.


    Now, I am writing this on a Linux community where 99.9% of folks will disagree with me on every point. That is fine. (You asked me, I gave my opinion.)

    As for whether FreeBSD is "better" that's a bit of a loaded, non-specific question. I'm going to presume you mean for general use, in which case the answer is: Yes. For me, FreeBSD is better.

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