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So i've recently been looking into ripping my DVD collection into soft copies to stick onto a computer running a raid on my network, so i can watch movies over ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast meton_magis's Avatar
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    DVD ripping discussion.


    So i've recently been looking into ripping my DVD collection into soft copies to stick onto a computer running a raid on my network, so i can watch movies over my network, and there are so many frontends, i'm having a hard time figuring out the best way.

    I've tried K3B, and it was the best i've used, but it could only use proprietary codecs from what i saw.

    I tried ogmrip, and liked that i could use vorbis / theora / matroshka (sp?), but it took like 3 hours to rip an 1:30 hour movie.

    took a look at some other, but they had the same problem as K3B, but didn't show any noticeable improvement, or ripped in one codec, to decode / re-encode in the open source ones.

    Does anyone know of a program that can rip dvd to an open source (preferably the ogg family) codec and container that does so in a reasonable amount of time. I have no problem with command line operation either, i'm quite comfortable using it. The open source codec isn't a STRICT requirement, but i like being able to play them without having to install encumbered libraries (i use fedora 90% of the time, and redhat doesn't include them out of the box.)

    also addind your own 2 cents about how and why you like one program over another wouldn't be horible.

    THANKS.
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    Quote Originally Posted by meton_magis View Post
    I've tried K3B, and it was the best i've used, but it could only use proprietary codecs from what i saw.
    Are you sure? It's just a frontend to transcode (a command line program, that you could use, by the way), so it should support more formats. I haven't tried it though.

    I tried ogmrip, and liked that i could use vorbis / theora / matroshka (sp?), but it took like 3 hours to rip an 1:30 hour movie.
    In which kind of machine and how many passes? That's important to know.

    took a look at some other, but they had the same problem as K3B, but didn't show any noticeable improvement, or ripped in one codec, to decode / re-encode in the open source ones.
    I don't understand that.

    Does anyone know of a program that can rip dvd to an open source (preferably the ogg family) codec and container that does so in a reasonable amount of time. I have no problem with command line operation either, i'm quite comfortable using it. The open source codec isn't a STRICT requirement, but i like being able to play them without having to install encumbered libraries (i use fedora 90% of the time, and redhat doesn't include them out of the box.)

    also addind your own 2 cents about how and why you like one program over another wouldn't be horible.

    THANKS.
    I use mencoder. It can handle about anything. Too much options, though, if you are looking for something easy.

    About the distros... Officially they don't support anything. Silly laws, patents, you know. You have to set repositories to install most stuff that can play an mpeg stream, because it's ilegal in many countries. Certainly, it's not in mine.

    Metradistros like Gentoo don't have this problem though.

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast meton_magis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    Are you sure? It's just a front end to transcode (a command line program, that you could use, by the way), so it should support more formats. I haven't tried it though.
    I'll Google it, i saw that a lot of the programs required transcode, but i thought it was a library, not a command line, I'll check it out.



    In which kind of machine and how many passes? That's important to know.
    I got 2.5 GHz core 2 quad core, 4 gigs of ram, a high quality dvd drive (don't know specs, but it was the highest numbers,) and a 3x 7200 RPM raid 0 array. The important part of my comment is that it took twice as long as the K3b. maybe it was my settings, i don't know, I was using the defaults. All i know is that it shouldn't take 3 hours for an hour 1/2 movie on the basic settings ..... i think.

    I use mencoder. It can handle about anything. Too much options, though, if you are looking for something easy.
    The problem with mencoder, is that as far as i know, it only converts from one codec to another, and you often get loss of quality going from one lossy codec to another.


    About the distros... Officially they don't support anything. Silly laws, patents, you know. You have to set repositories to install most stuff that can play an mpeg stream, because it's ilegal in many countries. Certainly, it's not in mine.

    Metradistros like Gentoo don't have this problem though.
    I fully understand this, i wanted open source so i wouldn't have to deal with the extra crap. If i have to keep going out to the internet and downloading codec packs EVERY time i reinstall an OS (i do this quite often), it gets quite annoying. I suppose i could just make a backup of the Mplayer codecs and keep those on a cd, but it's still an inconvenience. PLUS i like to feel like i support open source whenever possible.


    well thanks for the response, I'll check out the transcode, and see what i find.
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  4. #4
    Linux Newbie sdimhoff's Avatar
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    I think that mplayer is a good option. The advantage is that you can rip at as high (or low) of quality as you would like (unless you have ultra high standards). A simple command such as:

    mplayer dvd:1 -dumpstream Title.vob

    will rip a ~1hr 30 min. dvd to a ~4-5 Gb vob file in less than 10 min. You can also rip to different formats depending on what support you have built into mplayer.

    Mplayer (and mencoder, depending on what route you want to go) do have a lot of options, however I don't think of this as a bad thing. Most of the time you just use a short command, but it is nice to have the flexibility to do something out of the ordinary if you want to put in the time to learn the ins and outs.
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