Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
what configuration file stores the volume percent amount that multimedia keys (like XF86AudioRaiseVolume) change? The current setting of 11% is too high for me....
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16

    how to change the XF86AudioRaiseVolume amount?


    what configuration file stores the volume percent amount that multimedia keys (like XF86AudioRaiseVolume) change? The current setting of 11% is too high for me.

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie unlimitedscolobb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by redss View Post
    what configuration file stores the volume percent amount that multimedia keys (like XF86AudioRaiseVolume) change? The current setting of 11% is too high for me.
    I am not sure I have ever seen such a value stored anywhere.

    However, all software mixers I have seen (including Alsamixer - ALSA wiki) provide at least two volume controls: master and PCM. 100% set on the PCM control usually means that the volume of the sound corresponds to the percentage on the master control.

    Simple example: suppose you have 60% on the master control and 50% on the PCM control. This means that the actual sound level is 50% of 60% = 30%. If you reassign the key XF86AudioRaiseVolume to change the PCM level instead of the master level, you will be able to achieve your goal. Knowing which window manager you are running can greatly help in giving further advice.

    Besides, you may have a physical volume control on your hardware, which I suppose you don't once you are asking this question

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,508
    Some of these settings may be found in files under /proc/asound. Typically when an API call like the one you mention gets into the kernel, the new setting is stored in the /proc file system dynamically. Also, some of those settings can be altered by writing the correct data to the files. As to which they are for this, I don't know. I use the system ALSA or Pulse mixers to set my system sound, and it generally stays there between reboots.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    15

    I use Alsamixer.

    It's very simple to tweak the sound settings. From the command-line just type:

    alsamixer

    then use your directional arrows to adjust the sound settings. Then exit out of the application. Finally to save; just type:

    alsactl store

    That's pretty much it. I hope that helps.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •