Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
I've just switched to Ubuntu, and there's one nagging problem I have. It's from sound not coming up some programs. From the title, you can guess I've been using "killall ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    27

    I hate "killall esd"


    I've just switched to Ubuntu, and there's one nagging problem I have. It's from sound not coming up some programs. From the title, you can guess I've been using "killall esd" command before running programs, but I'm getting sick and tired of doing this for every program I have to use this for. Anybody know of a workaround in GNOME so I don't have to keep using "killall esd" just to make sure I get sound?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,267
    simply create a batch file that calls this method and then your app
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    27
    Same as a Windows batch file? Or is there something more to create it?

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,267
    create a .bin file, something like (GameNameStart)
    Code:
    #!/bin/sh
    killall esd
    callGameName
    #end is here
    give execute access to the script and your good to go.
    hopefully killall esd doesnt require root access... otherwise you would have to give x access to user ...


    EDIT : killall rights are fine
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast puntmuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Republic Banana
    Posts
    562
    Code:
    #!/bin/sh
    # this is a shell command
    /path/to/command1
    /path/to/command2
    The first line is important, it defines the program to use for the script, /bin/sh is often a symlink to /bin/bash
    The second line is comment, you could include as many lines of comment as you want
    Then the actual commands you want to execute.
    I\'m so tired .....
    #200472

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    27
    That works! I should be worshipping you for helping out with my probs, Ugo.

    And thanks for the info tidbit puntmuts, I must remember that in the future.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •