Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
I recently wanted to convert the audio contents of some of my DVD's to ogg's so I could listen to them on my Palm Pilot. It wasn't as easy as ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,907

    How to... Rip DVD to various audio formats


    I recently wanted to convert the audio contents of some of my DVD's to ogg's so I could listen to them on my Palm Pilot. It wasn't as easy as I thought it was going to be, so I thought I'd share the experience here. Believe it or not, I found almost nothing on the web about this. All the tutorials out there are about converting DVDs to some other video format, not audio. Maybe someone else has a much simpler way to do it?

    Running Mandrake 10.1.

    First I installed DVD::Rip to be able to rip the contents of the the DVD. Obviously this program does much more then this tutorial will cover, but it servered my purposes well. After some basic setup, you can simply choose which chapter to rip or rip the entire thing by pressong the Rip button. This will give you several file formats of the enitre chapter/movie selection including .avi and .vob. After you've ripped the chapter, you can select create .wav from the Operate drop down menu. You now have a .wav file.

    However, Grip won't read it, b/c it's not on a CD. So I busted out Audacity. Audacity did a fine job of ripping it to ogg, but the mp3 was rather choppy for some reason. Also, neither the mp3 nor the ogg file would play on my Palm, as it requires a sample rate of 44,100 KHz (CD Standard) rather then the 48000 KHz it was ripped at (DVD Standard). Drat! Changing the sample rate in Audacity was simple enough by selecting the drop down menu to left of the spectrum display, but then both the mp3 and the ogg played in slow motion! The solution was to change the sample rate, export it was a 44100 KHz .wav file, then convert that to ogg or mp3. That gave me a perfect sounding audio file at the correct sample rate.

    Hope that helps anyone else trying to do that!
    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    B'ham Alabama
    Posts
    240
    So you did the whole movie in audio? Or am I misunderstanding and you just did the audio files? I am going to give it a look thanks..
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.

    Plato

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    B'ham Alabama
    Posts
    240
    I recently wanted to convert the audio contents of some of my DVD's to ogg's
    Heh.. never mind..
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.

    Plato

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1

    A quicker way

    There is (at least) a much quicker way:

    transcode -x null,dvd -i /dev/dvd -T2,4 -a 1 -y null,ogg -b 320 -J resample -E 44100 -o test.ogg

    this extracts the audio track 1 (-a 1) of chapter 4 of title 2 (-T2,4) of /dev/dvd
    (-i /dev/dvd) and converts it to ogg format (-y null,ogg), bitrate 320 (-b 320, default is 12 resampled at 44100 (-J resample -E 44100), saving it in file test.ogg (-o test.ogg).

    to get wav files ready to be burnt in an audio cd, use -y wav instead.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •