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View Poll Results: What Should You Expect From Linux When It Comes To Multimedia Performance?

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  • Linux is mostly fast.

    20 42.55%
  • There are a few problems.

    16 34.04%
  • It is difficult to make Linux live up to my expectations.

    6 12.77%
  • I do not know/No straigth forward answer.

    5 10.64%
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How about in 3D accelerated programs, like games? Should you accept if it is remarkable slow?...
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  1. #11
    MHJ
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    How about in 3D accelerated programs, like games? Should you accept if it is remarkable slow?

  2. #12
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MHJ
    How about in 3D accelerated programs, like games? Should you accept if it is remarkable slow?
    I haven't seen "remarkably slow" performance with my Nvidia Geforce 6800 using the latest Linux drivers from their official website. I play games like Doom 3, which are far from lightweight on your system, and I can turn on all the bells and whistles with no marked slowdown.

    Are you asking from personal experience, or just in general?
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  3. #13
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    I think my only real annoyance with multimedia in linux is when a "for-pay" distro doesn't come with the codecs, etc. It bugs me that my SuSE boxed set cost $70 and it doesn't come with support for playing DVDs, etc. right out of the box. I understand that the free distros generally can't distribute the codecs, etc., but when you're paying for the distro I think multimedia should be included...they can use part of the cash I give them to pay the frigging licensing fees.
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  5. #14
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    I think my only real annoyance with multimedia in linux is when a "for-pay" distro doesn't come with the codecs, etc. It bugs me that my SuSE boxed set cost $70 and it doesn't come with support for playing DVDs, etc. right out of the box. I understand that the free distros generally can't distribute the codecs, etc., but when you're paying for the distro I think multimedia should be included...they can use part of the cash I give them to pay the frigging licensing fees.
    My thoughts exactly.
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  6. #15
    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    I think my only real annoyance with multimedia in linux is when a "for-pay" distro doesn't come with the codecs, etc. It bugs me that my SuSE boxed set cost $70 and it doesn't come with support for playing DVDs, etc. right out of the box. I understand that the free distros generally can't distribute the codecs, etc., but when you're paying for the distro I think multimedia should be included...they can use part of the cash I give them to pay the frigging licensing fees.
    My thoughts exactly.
    You can count me in on this train of thought as I also purchased SuSE 9.3 and feel that the multimedia packs/codecs and the ability to play DVD's should have been included.
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  7. #16
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    Yep, as much as I never threw any bad feeling towards Novell/SuSE for the lack of DVD support, it was only the other day when I set up my Dad's PC with 9.3 (Yup I converted a 50 year old man and he's loving it... ) that I really felt the need. I don't mind geeking around with it, but my Dad would have trouble adding the correct repositories, replacing video engines,looking for libdvdcss etc etc. €80 should well include the codecs considering you are able to download it for free a few months later.

    I think all of the major distros should be looking this way. Even if it is a case of getting the OS free, and paying €15 for an extra disk with the multimedia packages on it.

  8. #17
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    eh, not that bad... there are a few problems. Lack of DVD support has already been covered, I personally have issues getting things to stream from the internet. I'm sick of having to open Xine or MPlayer externally and loading a URL through it to stream a video, only to have the damn file be an unsupported MS or Real type file. Kinda irritating...

    Other than that, everything works great. I play lots of music on it (though less now that i've got a Mac with itunes...) games work great, i've got an older system and get a very good framerate on Doom3, so you should be able to get your graphics working better, unless of course you've got an ATI card, in which case you have other issues to worry about...

  9. #18
    MHJ
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    games work great, i've got an older system and get a very good framerate on Doom3, so you should be able to get your graphics working better, unless of course you've got an ATI card, in which case you have other issues to worry about...
    Exactly how old is your system?
    I have a Matrox g400 card, wich, AFAIK, have alrigth drivers.[/url]

  10. #19
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    Depends...

    Linux performance are too much dependent by hardware/software conbinations...

    I've just finished a video player project... I've always used XFree86 with a Savage4 chip... That was terrible seeing many artifacts on the screen because the video card hardware scaler (I think this is a X driver issue, because my boss told me about that graphic adaptor performance on Window boxes). So I've tried other X servers (such as X.org ans various versions)... X.org it twice slower for me!!! While XFree86 take 10 ms to output a video slice, X.org takes more than 20 ms!!!! And video quality is worst...

    Maybe Linux need a better support for hardware...
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  11. #20
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Re: Depends...

    Quote Originally Posted by burnit
    Maybe Linux need a better support for hardware...
    This is a broad generalization. Admittedly, hardware support in Linux is problematic in some areas (display cards for certain brands, wiFi, some software modems) but this is by no means the fault of LINUX as a whole.

    Allow me to shed some light on the "Linux needs better hardware support" conundrum:

    Let's say for instance I want to write a Linux WiFi driver for a Linksys WMP54G wireless PCI card. If I write to Linksys, they'll say they didn't make the chipset, and I need to talk to Broadcom. If I talk to Broadcom, they'll tell me that the specifications I need to write a Linux driver are trade secrets and they could not possibly release them to me without a fee of some sort, or they'll just flatly refuse to release them at all. I ask why they offer drivers for MS Windows and have no interest in supporting other operating systems and they tell me there is not enough market value in supporting Linux. Dead end.

    The problem with most hardware that doesn't work in Linux is that the people who make the hardware do not make drivers for Linux, and in most cases outright refuse to allow other people to make Linux drivers either. In order to make a proper driver without doing something illegal (like reverse-engineering a MS Windows driver) you need a few basic things, one of which are the exact hardware specifications for that device. Basically you need to know how the device talks to your computer, and every device is slightly different in this respect. If you don't have a map of what goes where, writing a driver is an exercise in futility.
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