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I saw the excellent post on converting AVI files to DVD ( http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/sho...ighlight=video ). I want to do basically the same thing, but the difference is I'm starting with mpeg ...
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  1. #1
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    mpeg to DVD (vob) format conversion?


    I saw the excellent post on converting AVI files to DVD (http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/sho...ighlight=video). I want to do basically the same thing, but the difference is I'm starting with mpeg files from my digital camera. My guess is I need to use transcode to make the conversion, but I can't tell from the online documentation how to do this. Does anyone know how to accomplish this?
    Last edited by techieMoe; 12-28-2005 at 07:59 PM.

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    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
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    some suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by redbeard
    I saw the excellent post on converting AVI files to DVD (http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/ showthread.php?t=42960&highlight=video). I want to do basically the same thing, but the difference is I'm starting with mpeg files from my digital camera. My guess is I need to use transcode to make the conversion, but I can't tell from the online documentation how to do this. Does anyone know how to accomplish this?
    That URL doesn't work for me.... I can't figure out which specific thread you are refering to.

    Are you talking about mpeg files from a digital camcorder? Or avi files from a digital still camera? ... or do you have a digital still camera that actually provides mpeg files (I've never read of such a "beast" before).

    A useful URL is:
    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/MMM/Too...ilm_production

    Free programs that can be used for editting videos are cinellera, Jahshaka, kino, lives, avidemux. Depending on the initial format of your video only some of these programs will work for you.

    Then, dependant on the format of your video/audio, you can use avidemux (or command line tools such as mencoder, mplayer, ffmpeg, transcode), or some front end programs such as tovid, videotrans, KDE DVDAuthor Wizard, DVDStyler, QDVD Author, etc ... to create the video files for the DVD (and then use K3b to burn). ...

    What is the video/audio format that you start with?

    Also, if you want to explore different packages, but not spend too much time installing (which can be a real pain at times), then try the live CD from http://www.mediainlinux.org/ . Once you find a package from that live CD that you like, you can then make the time and effort to install the package on your PC. .... At least that is the approach that I intend to follow.

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    Thanks so much for taking the time to help me with this!

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu
    That URL doesn't work for me.... I can't figure out which specific thread you are refering to.
    Sorry about the broken link. I added a line break so it wouldn't stretch out the entire page. I didn't realize the url tagging still worked in the new version of the forum. Here is the thread I was referencing: http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/sho...ighlight=video

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu
    or do you have a digital still camera that actually provides mpeg files (I've never read of such a "beast" before)
    I have an HP R707 camera which actually provides mpeg files. I did some searching on the HP website this morning, and found out that the camera's native format is MPEG1 (and I have it set for NTSC). So as I understand it, what I need to do is convert the original mpeg1 to mpeg2 format. Am I on the right track here? Does this narrow down which tool I should use to do this?

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    More info

    In my further research on this question I came across a command (tcprobe) which tells more about the type of mpeg files my camera creates. I don't know if this helps or not but thought I would post it in case it does:

    Code:
    redbeard@linux:~/tmp/dvdtest> tcprobe -i hpim0669.mpg
    [tcprobe] MPEG program stream (PS)
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    big_values too large! 398
    Blocktype == 0 and window-switching == 1 not allowed.
    big_values too large! 408
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    big_values too large! 398
    Blocktype == 0 and window-switching == 1 not allowed.
    big_values too large! 408
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    big_values too large! 398
    Blocktype == 0 and window-switching == 1 not allowed.
    big_values too large! 408
    bitstream problem: resyncing...
    big_values too large! 398
    Blocktype == 0 and window-switching == 1 not allowed.
    big_values too large! 408
    [tcprobe] summary for hpim0669.mpg, (*) = not default, 0 = not detected
    import frame size: -g 320x240 [720x576] (*)
         aspect ratio: 1:1
           frame rate: -f 29.970 [25.000] frc=4 (*)
                       PTS=62.4057, frame_time=33 ms, bitrate=104857 kbps
    redbeard@linux:~/tmp/dvdtest>

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    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
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    more thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by redbeard
    I have an HP R707 camera which actually provides mpeg files. I did some searching on the HP website this morning, and found out that the camera's native format is MPEG1 (and I have it set for NTSC). So as I understand it, what I need to do is convert the original mpeg1 to mpeg2 format. Am I on the right track here? Does this narrow down which tool I should use to do this?
    It does narrow it down a bit. .... I'm no expert on this. ... I tried a number of times to get a dialog going comparing applications, but I received minimal to no replies to my posts, and realized after a while I was just posting to myself. ... So I stopped.

    From what I have read, the program kino might work with your mpeg1 format. For certain you will be able to open it with avidemux. Since I am more interested in my digital still camera's .avi format than .mpeg, I plan to spend my time learning lives and cinelerra. Your choice of application will likely be driven, in part, by how much editing you want to do, and which sort of "special affects" (such as fades/transitions) you want to add between scenes. ... Again, I know nothing about this yet, ... I'm trying to get into it.

    The programs tovid and videotrans will accept most formats (including, I believe mpeg1) and produce mpeg2 output ready for dvd burning (or dvd authoring, if you want to get more fancy). Of course, you probably should edit your movie clips before you send the output to tovid or videotrans.

    I have read one of the tricky aspects is keeping the sound synchronised to the video. Presumeably some programs are better than other's at this, but I have no real experience in it.

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    Smile That did it!

    Thanks oldcpu! I can't tell you how much I appreciate your help here!

    I took a look at the documentation for videotrans on SourceForge and from the description it looked like exactly what I was looking for:
    The videotrans project is a set of scripts that converts a movie file in any format that mplayer understands (AVI, etc) to a DVD compatible VOB file, including all the necessary conversions.
    The manpage is really very good, too. This program seems to be a well kept secret because the only rpms I could find were for a distro called CCux Linux. I decided to try the CCux rpm on my open suse system, and aside from some false dependancy warnings about needing mplayer (I already have it installed) it installed fine and works like a dream. It really made the conversion a simple process. I was able to have it do the entire conversion in one step, and it did all of the work! Here is how easy it was:
    Code:
    redbeard@linux:~/tmp/dvdtest> movie-to-dvd -m ntsc -M hpim0669.mpg
    --> Finding properties for hpim0669.mpg
    
    --> Frame rate is already at 30000:1001, so the video can be used as-is. It
        is not necessary to stretch or shorten the audio.
    
    --> Source has 44100Hz standard audio with 2 channels. Converting it to a
        48000Hz WAV with 2 channels using mplayer. Converting the audio from
        WAV to MP2 using mp2enc.
    
    --> Converting <hpim0669.mpg> to <hpim0669.vob>
    
    --> Source size:        320x240
        Source crop area:   320x240
        Destination size:   352x240
        Final screen size:  352x240
        Destination aspect: 4:3
    
    --> Multiplexing audio and video using mplex
    
    --> Done encoding <hpim0669.mpg>
    
    redbeard@linux:~/tmp/dvdtest>
    The sound remained synchronised perfectly with the video, so there weren't any problems there.

    As a side benefit, using the tool without the -M switch causes it to leave the audio track separate. I did this on an mpeg I recently took where we first captured my daughter saying her first word ("Momma") and I was able to import the mp2 stream into Audacity, cut out all but the parts I wanted to keep, and export the file as an MP3. Now I'm emailing the mp3 to relatives who are out of state!

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    some thoughts

    Well done with videotrans. I also like it.

    But be certain to check out tovid as well. There are times when I find tovid does a better job than videotrans (and visa versa). avidemux is also a great program (and much much more powerful), although I find the command line tovid and videotrans easier to use than the gui based avidemux.

    Its always good to have multiple ways to do things. ...

  9. #8
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    dvbcut is a useful utility program

    If you are working with the .mpg format, another small utility program that is worth having available is dvbcut. I found it excellent to performing "cuts" between keyframes, while still retaining video/audio synchronisation.
    http://dvbcut.sourceforge.net/

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    Thanks again!

    This is really exciting seeing how many excellent video manipulation tools there are in linux. I installed dvbcut and have started playing with it. It doesn't like the mpeg files my camera creates so I tried running one through videotrans first and that seemed to work. I'm just starting to play with it (dvbcut), but so far it seems to be fairly unstable on my machine. I guess that is to be expected given the low version number.

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