Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 10 of 10
I have some movies of my wedding in PAL format on multipls DVD-Rs I'd like to do two things with these DVD-Rs: 1) Copy the PAL DVD and create a ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2

    Legitimate DVD Copying and PAL to NTSC Conversions


    I have some movies of my wedding in PAL format on multipls DVD-Rs
    I'd like to do two things with these DVD-Rs:

    1) Copy the PAL DVD and create a backup so I can lend out the backups to family instead of the original wedding DVD
    2) I'd like to convert the PAL DVD to a NTSC DVD

    I'm currently running Fedora Core I and I've tried using DVDRip and various other tools but they're apparently written to rip DVDs and convert the to (S)VCDs.

    Can anyone help me out with some information on what tools ( and steps, if possible ) I must use in order to accomplish the two tasks above?

    Thanks
    Pankaj

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    3,284
    im not sure that anyone here knows the answer, as this is the 2nd time the question has been posted.

    Its sad when this happens, as we try our best to answer as much as we can, but unfortunatly, nobody knows everything.

    You could try asking on these forums: http://www.dvdrhelp.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=19 as your next step to getting help with this problem.

    If you do get an answer, it would be good to let us know, so that we can point others in the right direction in the future.

    Thanks,

    Jason

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    1,296
    would I be rightin saying that the difference between PAL and NTSC is simply the aspect ratio? int hat case mplayer can convert it and save it in the save format. k3b can write the files to dvd

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1
    With respect to the difference between PAL and NTSC:

    The primary differences between PAL and NTSC are the supported frame rates and
    resolutions. PAL, for example, supports greater vertical resolution while NTSC
    supports a higher frame rate.

    There is in fact no difference between aspect ratios. Both are appropriate for popular
    ratios such as 4:3 and 16:9.

    would I be rightin saying that the difference between PAL and NTSC is simply the aspect ratio?
    With respect to the original question about converting from PAL DVD to NTSC DVD:

    vobcopy is an appropriate tool to extract the MPEG2 program stream from
    the DVD.

    mount /dev/dvd /mnt/cdrom # modify as appropriate
    vobcopy -l # that is the lowercase L

    mjpegtools are appropriate for adjusting the framerate and resolution.

    First use mplayer to demux the program stream yielding the video elementary stream.
    You can either background mplayer and start the `cat` line in the foreground or
    simply run these commands in different windows. The `cat` line reads from the
    named-pipe output of mplayer, so don't wait for mplayer to terminate before
    invoking `cat`.

    mkfifo stream.yuv
    mplayer -ao null -noframedrop -vo yuv4mpeg /path/to/vobcopy-pr/path/to/vobcopy-produced-VOB-file &
    cat stream.yuv | yuvfps -r 30000:1001 | yuvscaler -n n -O DVD | mpeg2enc -n -n -f 8 -F 4 -o out.m2v

    Now go back to the original vobcopy-produced program stream (VOB file) and grab the
    audio.

    mplayer -ao pcm -vo null -vc dummy /path/to/vobcopy-produced-VOB-file

    Then encode it as AC3 audio.

    ffmpeg -ab 224 -ac 2 -ar 48000 -i audiodump.wav audiodump.ac3

    Then remux the new video and audio programs.

    mplex -f 8 -o ready-to-master.mpg out.m2v audiodump.ac3

    Then use dvdauthor to master the DVD filesystem.

    cat << EOF > dvdauthor.xml
    <dvdauthor dest="/home/decourl/target-dir-for-dvd-filesystem-image">
    <vmgm>
    </vmgm>
    <titleset>
    <titles>
    <video />
    <pgc>
    <vob file="ready-to-master.mpg" />
    </pgc>
    </titles>
    </titleset>
    </dvdauthor>
    EOF

    dvdauthor -x dvdauthor.xml

    Then use growisofs to generate the ISO and burn directly to DVD in one step.
    growisofs is part of dvd+rw-tools.

    growisofs -Z /dev/dvd -dvd-video /target-dir-for-dvd-filesystem-image

    Welcome to the world of Linux-based video processing. Most everything is
    possible, but don't expect a foo2bar-style program to exist for your exact
    problem.

    Instead, understand the properties that your source video has,
    and also understand the properties that the desired destination video has.

    Use the appropriate tools to generate a filter-chain from one format to another.

    mplayer is your friend. It can read anything and render it not just to the screen, but
    to "raw" formats that you can then filter and recode however you like.

    dvdauthor is a must for generating consumer-compatible DVDs in Linux, but it
    still requires properly formatted input (ie: not some MPEG4 AVI that you got off the
    net).

    transcode is a set of tools that can be used in place of mjpegtools. It relies upon
    libraries from many different Linux video processing efforts and attempts to internalize
    the complicated pipelines that are necessary within one executable. It also provides
    simple tools to accomplish different tasks, such as muxing and demuxing.
    One downside is that it has a complicated command-line. In my example, transcode is not
    used.

    Another tool that can do filtering and MPEG2 encoding is mencoder. I do not believe
    that mencoder currently produces dvdauthor-compliant output (at least not as shipped)
    so I would not recommend using the MPEG2 encoding feature of mencoder for generating
    DVDs. mencoder does a good job of outputting to an AVI container but not to an MPEG
    container.

    ffmpeg is another MPEG encoder that competes with mpeg2enc. There are various
    opinions as to which works better under which circumstances. Because you are talking
    about wedding videos (the classic example where high quality is a must), you will
    want to try both and compare your output. An obvious parameter that you will need
    to jack up (not shown in the example) is the target bitrate. ffmpeg also has a two-pass
    encoding option that can be used to increase quality. I don't recall exactly, but I believe
    that the desire for a second pass may have something to do with generating Huffman
    encoding trees that you might have learned about if you are/were a computer science
    student.

    Anyhow, these are the tools that need to be used. Either use the technique that I
    suggested above (using mplayer to decode the video, mjpegtools to filter it, and
    mpeg2enc to re-encode it) or use transcode to accomplish all three of those steps
    in one.

    Good luck to you. There are excellent HOWTOs about DVD burning using Linux. One is
    hosted on Gentoo forums. Remember that you need to accomplish appropriate frame-rate
    and resolution adjustments to get from PAL to NTSC. Otherwise, it's just like unpackaging
    something from one box and repackaging it in another.

    If by chance you are not familiar with the concepts of audio and video codecs and container
    formats, look for that information first.

    There are quite a few shared library dependencies you need to get started with this stuff.
    Most distros don't ship this stuff - especially commercial distros that don't want the
    perceived liability of providing software capable of DVD duplication. As such, a Linux
    box for this type of work is something of a custom machine. Find a distro that has
    dvdauthor, mjpegtools, transcode, mplayer, ffmpeg, and vobcopy under package management.

    Be aware that this stuff is CPU and disk intensive. As a rule of thumb, expect it to take
    longer to process a video than it would to watch it. Exactly how many times longer, that
    depends on your system, which tools you use, and how you invoke them. Basically,
    expect that processing each DVD will be an 'overnighter' - especially if you opt for
    the mpeg2enc route.

    Also be aware that complications can arise from issues such as interlacing. It can be
    extremely difficult to wrap your mind around these issues, and it is possible that you
    can discard video quality if you don't use the right filters and switches. I won't say
    more about this topic for fear of demonstrating that I don't know much about its
    intricacies.

    Another approach to the frame rate conversion would involve forcing the frame-rate
    conversion tool to pretend that the input has a frame rate of 23.976 fps instead of
    25 fps. This will cause your video to slow down by about 4%. You will probably notice the
    4% speed difference less than you would notice the artifacts from converting directly.
    The fps-adjusting tools have switches that will cause them to disregard the information in the
    header and run with user-supplied parameters such as this. These switches are designed for
    use when the header contains incorrect information, but can be used here to our advantage.

    The reason that you might want to do this is because there is a process called telecine
    that can be used to convert from film (24 fps) to NTSC video (30 fps) that works by
    accomplishing something called a 3:2 pulldown.

    If you convert directly from 25 to 30 frames per second, the frame-rate adjuster is forced
    to find some way to add 5 frames to every second. It is likely to accomplish this simply
    by repeating every Nth frame, which will cause your video to appear to be 'paused' 5 times
    per second.

    Of course, if you lie to your fps-converter about the input frame rate, the actual length
    of your video will change slightly. You will therefore have to modify the audio track
    similarly so as to maintain A/V sync. A good tool for this would be sox, which you can
    run against the wav file generated by mplayer before re-encoding the audio. Honestly,
    realigning audio and video is always a pain in the butt. If you do your calculations correctly,
    it might "just plain work". The multiplexers (mplex and tcmplex) both have switches that
    (supposedly) allow you to introduce an offset.

    It is also possible to encode a DVD using a technique called soft-telecine. Here, the video
    is encoded on the disc in the film frame rate, and the player itself is instructed to perform
    the pulldown. This has some advantages, such as the ability to increase run-time or bit-rate
    without requiring extra storage capacity. I would not recommend the soft-telecine technique
    because it is advanced, and because I do not believe that Linux support for it is mature
    across all of the different tools.

    If you don't have any luck, consider a professional service. I see some ads on google
    that offer this service at $20/disc. Or, get a PAL or dual-standard DVD player.
    Converting from PAL to NTSC will necessarily discard information (due to downscaling),
    and will also necessarily require a decode-recode cycle for the video. Even though we're
    dealing with "ones and zeroes", applying a lossy encoding algorithm such as MPEG2
    does cause distortion - especially when the source data is itself the rendering of an
    existing MPEG2. It's like "copying from a copy" on your VCR. Quality decreases with
    every generation.

    If your source DVD contains menus, you can convert the video and/or audio components
    of them just as you would convert the main title. But, to generate actual working menus,
    you will have to learn how to work with a subtitler (such as spumux) and mask images.
    This is outside of the scope of this document, but there are dvdauthor-related illustrations
    of how to accomplish this task.

    Pretty much all of the man pages are easy to understand with the exception of transcode
    and mplayer. These apps are mammoth beasts, so trying to understand their man pages is
    like trying to code a universal Turing machine in sed.


    -Lincoln

    I have some movies of my wedding in PAL format on multipls DVD-Rs
    I'd like to do two things with these DVD-Rs:

    1) Copy the PAL DVD and create a backup so I can lend out the backups to family instead of the original wedding DVD
    2) I'd like to convert the PAL DVD to a NTSC DVD

  5. #5
    Just Joined! turrauko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Aberdeen, MD
    Posts
    2

    Actually...

    As far as copying it goes, it'd be a breeze to just mount the CD-ROM and perform a quick and dirty dd command (the wedding video shouldn't be CSS encypted).

    Code:
    dd if=/dev/cdrom of=~/WeddingDVD.iso; # where '/dev/cdrom' matches your device or mount point.
    Give it a while (a really long while, in some cases) and you've got yourself an ISO ready for burning. By the way, if for some reason they did encrypt it, it will fail, miserably.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    1,142

    Some suggestions for PAL to NTSC

    Quote Originally Posted by pjain
    2) I'd like to convert the PAL DVD to a NTSC DVD

    I'm currently running Fedora Core I and I've tried using DVDRip and various other tools but they're apparently written to rip DVDs and convert the to (S)VCDs.

    Can anyone help me out with some information on what tools ( and steps, if possible ) I must use in order to accomplish the two tasks above?
    I recommend you find different packages (or learn command line commands) to:
    a. rip the PAL DVD to a PAL avi on hard drive,
    b. strip audio out of PAL avi,
    c. convert PAL avi to NTSC avi
    d. convert NTSC avi to DVD MPEG (NTSC)
    e. fix audio synchronisation,
    f. remux audio back into DVD MPEG
    g. author DVD (DVDauthor Wizard)
    h. burn DVD (K3b)

    If you already have the DVD ripped to a PAL "avi", then "tovid" script will convert PAL DVD to NTSC DVD (NTSC film or NTSC TV - take your pick). "tovid" struggles a bit with the audio, so you will likely have to strip the audio out, convert the audio to a speed consistent with the appropriate DVD format frames/sec, and then re-insert the audio. I think "audacity" will let you convert the audio, once it is stripped out.

    Some URLs:

    tovid
    http://tovid.sourceforge.net/
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/tovid

    audacity:
    http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

    KDE DVDAuthorWizard
    http://pingwing.xs4all.nl/view.php/page/DVDAuthor
    http://kde-apps.org/content/show.php?content=27528
    http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Multi...ard-3867.shtml

    You can also use different packages than the above ones that I suggested.

    Is this enough information for you to proceed?

    Edit: Updated 4-Dec-2005, removing version number for KDE DVDAuthorWizard, and adding extra link.

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    1,142

    Re: Some suggestions for PAL to NTSC

    In additition to "tovid" for frame rate conversions, I think the tool "bitterbpp" may also support frame rate conversions? (I haven't installed it yet myself). According to the web site, bitterbpp is a GUI interface for MPlayer, transcoding DVD titles (video, audio, and subtitles) to Matroska file format. I think it will also go further than just creating Matroska file formatted outputs.
    http://sunfryes.com/bitterbpp/about.html

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1

    transcode

    Well..., I found this question as I was searching the EXACT same question, but with different content (Don't ask if ya don't wanna know!!). I pulled up transcode, read the options in the help file (WAY shorter than the man page, I'm sure), picked out TWO simple options (-i or "input file", and --export_profile), hit return, and GUESS WHAT!!! It's encoding as I type this. My content was a PAL DVD .img file, but that wouldn't be too hard to get using mkisofs, huh?

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer oldcpu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    1,142

    Re: Some suggestions for PAL to NTSC

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu
    In additition to "tovid" for frame rate conversions, I think the tool "bitterbpp" may also support frame rate conversions?
    I had forgotten about this thread. Another package, which will do frame rate conversions is videotrans:

    videotrans [videotrans is a set of scripts that allow its user to reformat existing movies into the VOB format that is used on DVDs.]
    http://videotrans.sourceforge.net/
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/videotrans/

  10. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1

    Re: PAL to NTSC conversion

    Having just purchased a PAL VCR and a PAL DVD recorder, I have been working out how to get an NTSC DVD from my old PAL tapes.

    I use the recorder to generate a PAL DVD recording of the original VHS tape.

    Then I use DVD Rip to extract the VOB files from the DVD created by the recorder, putting the files in a subdirectory 'dvd'

    I then use the attached script to automate the process of generating a new DVD file in NTSC format which can be burned to a DVD-R.

    Curiously, the DVD recorder which created the original file has problems reading the converted file, stuttering and stalling when it tries to play it. My old Philips DVD player has no problems playing the disk though.

    Jeff
    Attached Files Attached Files

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •